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eBook The Emperor of Ocean Park: A Novel ePub

eBook The Emperor of Ocean Park: A Novel ePub

by Richard Allen,Stephen L. Carter

  • ISBN: 0736686452
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Richard Allen,Stephen L. Carter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Books on Tape; Unabridged edition (April 1, 2002)
  • ePub book: 1785 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1815 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 919

Description

The Emperor of Ocean Park is a 2002 novel by American author and law professor Stephen L. Carter. It is the first part of Carter's Elm Harbor series; two more novels in the series were published in 2007 and 2008.

The Emperor of Ocean Park is a 2002 novel by American author and law professor Stephen L. The book was Carter's first work of fiction, and spent 11 weeks on The New York Times best-seller list following its publication

By Stephen L. Carter Read by Richard Allen

By Stephen L. Carter Read by Richard Allen. By Stephen L. Carter Read by Peter Francis James. Q: In addition to being a novel of suspense and intrigue, The Emperor of Ocean Park is also a novel about families-the things that bring them together and tear them apart; the secrets they keep from one another and the rest of the world; the legacies they pass from one generation to the next. What made you want to explore the idea of family and how did you begin to imagine this fascinating Garland family?

Wall Street Journal The Emperor of Ocean Park is an outstanding work of. .Stephen L. Carter has woven a suspenseful novel of a man unraveling the mystery connected to his father's death.

Wall Street Journal The Emperor of Ocean Park is an outstanding work of fiction. Carter's ear for dialogue can't come close to matching Richard Russo or Richard Price for vernacular or realism, but also doesn't approach the (admittedly unrealistic) wit or fancy that some other authors I like employ. Also, the mechanism of elaborate pre-death scheming attributed to the Judge strikes one as a bit far-fetched.

Электронная книга "The Emperor of Ocean Park", Stephen L. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Emperor of Ocean Park" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Intricate, superbly written, often scathingly funny, The Emperor of Ocean Park is a triumphant work of fiction, packed with .

Intricate, superbly written, often scathingly funny, The Emperor of Ocean Park is a triumphant work of fiction, packed with character and incident-a brilliantly crafted tapestry of ambition, family secrets, murder, integrity tested, and justice has gone terribly wrong. This novel was a combination of mystery and conspiracy thriller, complete with antagonists lurking in the dark, the hint of extramarital affairs, academic and political betrayal and the scent of conspiracy in the air. Was murder involved or natural death?

ALSO BY STEPHEN L. CARTER God’s Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in Politics The Dissent of the .

I was glad to have the Vineyard house, a tidy little Victorian on Ocean Park in the town of Oak Bluffs, with lots of frilly carpenter’s Gothic along the sagging porch and a lovely morning view of the white band shell set amidst a vast sea of smooth green grass and outlined against a vaster sea of bright blue water.

The Emperor of the title, Judge Oliver Garland, has just died, suddenly. A brilliant legal mind, conservative and famously controversial, Judge Garland made more enemies than friends. Many years before, he’d earned a judge’s highest prize: a Supreme Court nomination. But in a scene of bitter humiliation, televised across the country, his nomination collapsed in scandal. Intricate, superbly written, often scathingly funny,The Emperor of Ocean Parkis a triumphant work of fiction, packed with character and incident-a brilliantly crafted tapestry of ambition, family secrets, murder, integrity tested, and justice gone terribly wrong.

2002 novel by Stephen L. An audiobook version, narrated by Richard Allen, was released on July 21, 2003. The Emperor of Ocean Park. Original 2002 hardback front cover. Audio read by. Richard Allen. The Emperor of Ocean Park forms part one of Carter's Elm Harbor series; the second book ( New England White ) was released in 2007, and the third ( Palace Council ) in 2008.

Stephen L. Carter makes his debut as a fiction writer with The Emperor of Ocean Park. On a few fronts Carter succeeded, but on others he failed, in that he did not capture the fundamental elements displayed by these authors - the most prominent being pacing. This is a tale of political manipulation, a Supreme Court justice confirmation hearing, and vengeance, all told through the point of view of a black middle class family. Simply put, the novel is too damn big, and juggles too many balls. With mystery and political intrigue/legal eagle novels, timing is everything.

Lemaster Carlyle assures me. It’s pretty much impossible to obtain a permit there. d world to purchase a legal handgun. Huh, is my thoughtful contribution. So, if a relative of mine who lived in . died and left a gun behind -in his teasing Barbadian lilt, he is tossing my transparent hypothetical back at me- my guess would be that he purchased it in Virginia and simply ignored the District’s laws.

Yale law professor Stephen L. Carter -- widely known for his keenly insightful works of political, social, and legal commentary -- offers a stunning fiction debut that distills his observations on government and human behavior into a spellbinding tale of one person's search for justice. Talcott Garland, a law professor at an unnamed Ivy League university, is snapped out of his private world of personal dissatisfactions by the death of his father, Judge Oliver Garland. Talcott's sister, a conspiracy theorist and former journalist, quickly concludes that the conservative, opinionated judge -- one of the few African-American nominees for the Supreme Court in the 1980s -- was the victim not of a heart attack but of foul play. Her ranting is dismissed as the product of misplaced grief and an overactive imagination, but after two other people turn up dead -- the bishop who performed the judge's funeral ceremony and a man who claimed to be an FBI agent (he is later revealed to have been a private detective) -- Talcott decides to investigate. He knows that 15 years earlier his father, faced with scandal, was forced to withdraw from consideration for the high court, but he is not prepared for the unsavory secrets he begins to uncover about his father's professional life. Nor does he realize that he's become a pawn in a fatal game that threatens to destroy his sanity and long-sought happiness. Dense with subplots that provide an inside view of Washington politics, the privileged world of Northeast upper-crust African-American society, and the inner workings of an Ivy League law school, this sweeping novel is a masterful portrayal of how justice can be twisted by public figures to serve private purposes, as well as a telling meditation on the corruptible nature of our structured society and power-crazed culture. (Will Romano)

Comments

Otiel Otiel
I CANNOT BELIEVE I PLOUGHED THROUGH 600 PLUS PAGES OF THIS BOOK. IT IS FAR FROM LITERATURE AND IF THE AUTHOR WAS NOT A BLACK LAW PROFESSOR IT WOULD NOT HAVE SEEN THE LIGHT OF DAY.IT IS SO TEDIOUS AND NEEDS MAJOR MAJOR CUTTING.

THE WRITING IS AVERAGE, THERE ARE LOTS OF DISCREPENCIES A GOOD EDITOR WOULD HAVE CAUGHT. eg, THEY ORDER CRABCAKES AND RICE AND THEN THE CHARACTER IS LOOKING AT THE FRENCH FRIES ON HIS PLATE.

THE WIFE, KIMMER IS ONE OF THE MOST ANNOYING, SELFCENTERED CHARACTERS I HAVE EVER CAME ACROSS.WHETHER THIS BOOK IS WRITEN BY A BLACK OR WHITE PERSON IT SHOULD HAVE TO MEET THE SAME STANDARDS AND THIS BOOK IS MOST UNSATISFYING.
Xal Xal
Stephen L. Carter has woven a suspenseful novel of a man unraveling the mystery connected to his father's death. But this is more than a thriller; it is a novel about families and the things that bring them together and tear them apart; the secrets they keep from one another and the rest of the world; the legacies they pass from one generation to the next.

Carter is an African-American law professor as is his main character, Talcott Garland. Through Talcott, he comments on issues of family, religion, law, education, race, marriage, wealth, and politics. I found the frequent philosophical digressions were some of the most interesting parts of
the novel. Talcott has beliefs and values he tries to live by despite other influences. His life is not turning out as he planned and he is the pawn in the hands of his father's legacy, his wife's ambition, his sister's obsession with conspiracy theories, his brother's escape to Argentina, and his cousin's mental collapse.

His father, a conservative Judge who has been disgraced during hearings for appointment to the Supreme Court, is found dead in his study and Talcott is charged from the grave to discover "arrangements" the honorable Judge Oliver Garland left behind. Through an intense and often violent search, Talcott deals with a disappearing scrapbook, two reappearing pawns, a mysterious delivery to a soup kitchen, and a stolen book of chess problems. Will he be able to fit all the pieces of the puzzle together and checkmate the opposition? Will the decades old hit-and-run death of his baby sister ever be resolved? Will the notorious underworld figure truly protect him, and at what price?

From the ivory tower of a Yale-like Law School to the often peaceful resort of Martha's Vineyard and a secluded condo in Aspen, the reader follows Talcott in his search for the truth. However, I felt the great fault in the writing is that the narrator does not tell the reader everything he knows. Since vital information is revealed to the reader only in retrospect, Talcott's reasoning process and actions are often confusing and hard to follow. However, clearing up the mystery of how his father died and, more importantly, how he had lived, does make Talcott's story one worth telling.
Kupidon Kupidon
Talcott Garland is a professor of law and the son of a former Federal Judge who stepped down from the bench amid much controversy. When Talcott, or Misha as his closest friends call him, receives word that his father has died, events start taking shape that lead to a fantastic mystery that only Misha has the key to solving.

It seems that the late Judge has left a series of clues, or riddles, that Misha is tasked with solving in order to find out what the Judge's "arrangements" were. The problem? Misha has no idea what these arrangements are or where to start looking. But a number of well connected and threatening individuals seem to know all about them and are eager for Misha to uncover the secrets the Judge hid so well. All the while, Misha has to cope with his failing marriage, his fear for the safety of himself and his family, his seemingly selfish brother, and his conspiracy theorist sister. Misha feels pulled in a million different directions while at the same time trying to live up to the expectations of a father with whom he was never close. His wife is in the running for a judicial appointment and doesn't want him to dredge up anything controversal that will stand in her way. His colleagues begin to think that he has lost his mind as he continues his father's search and makes what seem to be wild accusations. But his personal debates are nothing compared with the element of evil that is lurking in the shadows of every twist and turn.

In his debut work of fiction, Stephen Carter has written a cleverly crafted mystery that keeps the reader guessing as much as the chess moves described that underly the main story. He has created believable characters - some of which one loves, others one hates - that lend credence to the tale. He has also supplemented the mystery itself with the characters' own personal problems that make this a story about life as much as intrigue. My only fault with the novel is the discussion of race that is part of Misha's inner conflict. Misha makes many observations about black versus white and often is angered at his perceptions about disadvantages he suffers as a black man. While the author and his characters are certainly entitled to their opinions and feelings, this aspect adds nothing to the story of the novel. At times it just makes Misha seem bitter about race, but it never relates to the overall plot. I kept waiting for race to tie in to the mystery aspect of the book, but it never did and ultimately served as a distraction.

Overall, however, the novel was a well written and suspenseful mystery that keeps the reader guessing up to the last pages. But it was more than a mystery in it's look at human dynamics, what money and power can do to a person, and how important family can be, even in it's most disfunctional form.