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eBook The Book of Cain: A Novel of Suspense ePub

eBook The Book of Cain: A Novel of Suspense ePub

by Herb Chapman

  • ISBN: 0786708492
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Herb Chapman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Carroll & Graf Pub; 1st Carroll & Graf ed edition (May 10, 2001)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1347 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1965 kb
  • Other: rtf azw txt mobi
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 138

Description

The Book of Cain book. With suspenseful intensity, this engrossing novel unfolds a story of criminal pathology that introduces the talent of Herb Chapman, a new master of the genre.

The Book of Cain book.

Knox develops his characters appropriately, introducing us to a character's past in a manner that is meaningful to. .But most of all, "The Marks of Cain" provides deeper motivations for the characters than "The Genesis Secret" did.

Knox develops his characters appropriately, introducing us to a character's past in a manner that is meaningful to the story but also natural. Flashbacks, revelations of past events and relationships fit within the realm of Knox's book flawlessly, as reactions to emotional triggers or probing questions relevant to furthering the plot. In his second novel, Knox managed to clean up one of the few weak spots in his writing.

Herb Chapman's "The Book of Cain" is easily the best suspense thriller I've read in a year, and one of the most impressive fiction debuts I can remember. The reason this book succeeds so well is deceptively simple: author Chapman obviously took the care to plot his story well, and it largely succeeds at avoiding the contrivances that undermine so many other thrillers

Im a sophmore and im going on vactaion soon but there arent any good books that have recently been rleased that i've heard of, im kinda into the suspense, action, thriller, kinda books. Can anyine reccommend any good ones? Follow. Eye of the Beholder by David Ellis Heartsick by Chelsea Cain The Abduction by Mark Gimenez The King of Lies by William Lashner Midnight Rambler: A Novel of Suspense by James Swain The Book of Cain: A Novel of Suspense by Herb Chapman. Source(s): deb · 1 decade ago.

It was published on December 13, 2011. It is presented as a compendium of Diablo lore, shown as an illustrated history by Deckard Cain.

The Book of Cain : A Novel of Suspense by Herbert Chapman (2001, Hardcover). The Book of Lies by Brad Meltzer 2008 Book on CD Thriller Superman Cain Abel.

West Harrison, 07:13. Counterfeit Too, 06:33. Tracy Chapman Baby Can I Hold You. Супер-радио. Neil Young Heart of Gold.

Cain's Book is a 1960 novel by Scottish beat writer Alexander Trocchi. A roman à clef, it details the life of Joe Necchi, a heroin addict and writer, who is living and working on a scow on the Hudson River in New York. The book alternates between Necchi/Trocchi's attempts to score and flashbacks to his experiences as a child in Glasgow, and later as a young man in London and Paris.

Reading this book makes you appreciate the cleanliness of modern medicine. A dark mystery into the disappearance of a young woman and the poisoning of young doctor. It describes life in 19th century Philadelphia and discusses plans for the new modern hospital in Baltimore, John Hopkins.

Eight years after serial killer Isaac Drum's capture and weeks before his execution, Drum smuggles a letter to the widow of a police detective he murdered, stating that if his execution goes forward, her son will be abducted and killed, and FBI profiler John Keenan must decipher the truth from the threats.

Comments

SARAND SARAND
A very, very good read. My wife enjoyed it immensely.
The surprise is that I did also. I don't usually take to
crime/suspense novels but this one held my attention to the last word.
The tension didn't end until the resolution only a page or
two from the end. Then there was a slight twist after that
just to catch your heart off guard.

I thought the character development and miscellaneous notes
of environment descriptions were impressive- especially for
a first time author. My wife, to this day, believes that the
antagonist was the most evil portrayals she has ever
read (and she reads quite a lot of these crime/suspense novels.)

I would certainly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good
tension filled read. Book of Cain and two days rain will certainly
produce an enjoyable literary weekend.

Good job, Herb. You win the dollar.

PM
asAS asAS
I’m giving this 5 stars because for a first book (and only book that I can find) Chapman hits a homerun. It reminds me of a more realistic Thomas Harris tale, and the characters are very well developed. I enjoyed it thoroughly. As a former Correctional Officer, I can attest to his knowledge of the prison setting.
Tekasa Tekasa
This is a great first novel. Quite accurate in psychological aspects. A little different as there were few "twists and turns" as it was more a "police procedural". The characters were well developed and believable and real. I am looking forward to his next. Well look for his website and see what is forthcoming. Long and held my attention. Very well written.
Elastic Skunk Elastic Skunk
This read is entertaining, yes, but it's more than that. Chapman gives us characters who are complex. The hero is not infalliable. The villian is rotten to the core, but still garners sympathy (if you are a compassionate bleeding heart treehugger like me). The character you want to hate earns your respect. The end is especially powerful; I can't say more without spoiling it!

This story would make a great movie. Screenwriters out there, take note.
WOGY WOGY
I read a lot. I get distracted when an author repeatedly uses one or two specific words throughout an entire book. In Herb Chapman's "The Book of Cain", I have never, I mean never read about about so many people having flushed faces and/or scars as well as clenched or balled fists. These traits appear among many characters throughout the book. Clench, Flush, Clench, Ball, Flush, Flush, Flush, Ball, Clench, Clench. Dang!!! Enough. Only 60 some pages to go. Maybe one of the alleged "good guys" will get someone to clench their fists to death.
Renthadral Renthadral
Herb Chapman's "The Book of Cain" is easily the best suspense thriller I've read in a year, and one of the most impressive fiction debuts I can remember. The reason this book succeeds so well is deceptively simple: author Chapman obviously took the care to plot his story well, and it largely succeeds at avoiding the contrivances that undermine so many other thrillers.
Chapman knows the story is his book's strength, and he always plays to it. The writing style doesn't often stand out, but neither does it get in the way. A few scenes bog down along the way, but all in all Chapman--drawing from his real-life experience as a youth counsellor--has written a smart, lucid, and perceptive thriller that will hold your attention and stay with you long after you're done. Not as elegant as Thomas Harris, but nearly as nightmarish, "The Book of Cain" puts a bright spotlight on misery and the human capacity to do harm, and doesn't pretend to have all the answers.
Mr. Chapman should be proud of a job well done. With a minimum of fanfare, he's crafted a thriller that puts many of his undoubtedly higher paid and more profilic counterparts to shame.
Ienekan Ienekan
This book was recommended to me by a friend and was well worth every penny I spent on it. It has more than the standard two or three main characters, yet each is well-drawn and believable. Normally, when I read a mystery, by the time I'm 75% of the way through it, my main goal is to determine "whodunnit". This book totally engrossed me, so that I paid as much attention to all the details of the tale at page 275 as I did at page 25. It also left me contemplating the legacy that various 'ripples' in our lives create in the world of those around us. I suspect that Mr. Chapman's book will remain on my bookshelf for many years to come.