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eBook In the Company of Liars ePub

eBook In the Company of Liars ePub

by Dick Hill,Susie Breck,David Ellis

  • ISBN: 1597370010
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Dick Hill,Susie Breck,David Ellis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Abridged library edition (April 7, 2005)
  • ePub book: 1925 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1102 kb
  • Other: lit azw mobi docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 533

Description

David Ellis (Author), Dick Hill (Reader), Susie Breck (Reader) & 0 more. David Ellis’s previous novels include In the Company of Liars, Jury of One, Life Sentence, and Line of Vision, for which he won an Edgar Award

David Ellis (Author), Dick Hill (Reader), Susie Breck (Reader) & 0 more. David Ellis’s previous novels include In the Company of Liars, Jury of One, Life Sentence, and Line of Vision, for which he won an Edgar Award. An attorney from Chicago, he serves as Counsel to the Speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives.

Hill and Breck lead listeners through a minefield of potential distractions with artistry in a riveting performance.

Слушайте Rusty Nail (автор: J. A. Konrath, Dick Hill, Susie Breck) бесплатно 30 дней в. .Konrath creates the perfect blend of pulse-pounding thrills, side-splitting humor. - David Ellis,author of In the Company of Liars. Konrath, Dick Hill, Susie Breck) бесплатно 30 дней в течении пробного периода. Слушайте аудиокниги без ограничений в веб-браузере или на устройствах iPad, iPhone и Android. Jack Daniels is a detective for the new millennium: sharply witty, deftly wry, and unabashedly cleve. Читайте в мобильном приложении Scribd. Скачайте бесплатное мобильное приложение Scribd, чтобы читать когда угодно и где угодно.

David Ellis, Dick Hill (Narrator). Susie Breck (Narrator). In The Company Of Liars (Audio CD). ISBN: 1597370029 (ISBN13: 9781597370028). Published April 7th 2005 by Brilliance Audio. Author(s): David Ellis, Dick Hill (Narrator).

Written by David Ellis, Audiobook narrated by Dick Hill and Susie Breck. Narrated by: Dick Hill. Length: 12 hrs. Unabridged.

And why do you think it was so successful? he asks. Allison looks over Larry’s head at the shoppers in the grocery store. A character with warts, bumps, flaws, just like any other person. Yet, April wasn’t threatening to men, I don’t think. They liked her, too. She was funny. She didn’t mind having a door opened for her. I liked her. I loved that book.

Narrated by Dick Hill, Susie Breck Books related to In the Company of Liars. Hidden Man, The. David Ellis.

Narrated by Dick Hill, Susie Breck. When her nightmare is over, where will she be? In the company of friends - or the company of liars? About this title. Books related to In the Company of Liars.

David Ellis's In the Company of Liars is an audaciously inventive thriller. Jon Soliday is a legal counsel to a powerful politician-his childhood best friend-who is running for governor. In a David Ellis novel, nothing is ever what it seems, and so it is with Eye of the Beholder, a heart-pounding novel filled with dark secrets and the horrific lengths that desperate people will go to keep them. Renowned attorney Paul Riley has built a lucrative career based on his famous prosecution of Terry Burgos, a serial killer who followed the lyrics of a violent song to gruesomely murder six girls.

Our first picture of Allison is in the moments after her death.

Publisher Description. In the Company of Liars is that rare animal - a truly original thriller, strikingly fresh and unpredictable. Our first picture of Allison is in the moments after her death. Then the story moves backward in time: an hour before, then a day, back and back until we're at the beginning and can see what's really happened - and most shocking, what has not. At every turn, Allison knows what she sees may not be what's real. The only sure thing is her place in a vortex of half-truths, threat, and suspicion. When her nightmare is over, where will she be? In the company of friends - or the company of liars?

David Ellis's In the Company of Liars is an audaciously inventive thriller.

In the Company of Liars is that rare animal - a truly original thriller, strikingly fresh and unpredictable. Told chronologically in reverse, from its enigmatic end to its brilliant beginning, it’s centered around a woman on trial for murder - Allison Pagone, who is caught between competing forces, each represented by someone who may not care if the pressure kills her in the end. A prosecutor wants Allison convicted and put on death row. An FBI agent believes she can squeeze her into ratting on her family. A daughter and an ex-husband need to save their own skins. And circling them all, a group who would prefer to kill her quietly and anonymously, but who also are not what they seem.

Our first picture of Allison is in the moments after her death. Then the story moves backward in time like the acclaimed film Memento: an hour before, then a day, back and back until we’re at the beginning and can see what’s really happened - and most shocking, what has not. At every turn, Allison knows what she sees may not be what’s real. The only sure thing is her place in a vortex of half-truths, threat, and suspicion. When her nightmare is over, where will she be? In the company of friends - or the company of liars?

Comments

Malahelm Malahelm
This book is very hard to describe, much less evaluate. In essence, it is a legal thriller involving murder, terrorists, government intrigue, FBI operations, and courtroom drama. But Mr Ellis decided to tell the tale in a unique manner: backwards. He begins the book at the end of the story and every scene in the entire novel takes place one or two days before what you just read. Now, I am normally not a person who goes in for gimmics. Too often authors like to prove how smart they are by fooling the reader with a gimmic of some kind. However, I had high hopes for this one (I knew about the backwards thing before I ever began to read) because of the author's first published novel, "Line of Vision", which is one of the finest legal thrillers I've ever read.

I really struggled through the first third of this book. Most stories build up the plot and develop the characters in a logical progression, allowing the reader to absorb each new element one at a time. But here, since we are starting at the end, we have to see how all of the characters end up. We read about a suicide by a character but have no idea at the time who she is and why we should care. It's confusing to say the least. And to add to the confusion, the author frequently uses flashbacks of what the character is thinking...thoughts from their past...which we will read about in upcoming chapters...wow.

But then, suprisingly, it started to jell. But the time I was half way through the book, I knew who the main players were and what their motivations were. Now I wanted to know how events got to be the way they were. I'm sure that's how the author was approaching the whole book. The ending (beginning?) was quite good and went a long way in overcoming my initial objections to the "gimmic." I will admit to going back and re-reading the first 20-30 pages to see those events from the different perspective of knowing the whole story. That provided good closure for me. I would definitely classify this work as "smart" fiction, as the writing itself is well done, and obviously every aspect of the plot is well engineered. Overall, I am both happy to have read it and glad that it is behind me. I give the first half of the book 3 stars and the last half 5 stars...rounding out to 4.
Snowseeker Snowseeker
I was impressed by this technique in the movie Momento which was about as compelling as a movie can be. I found it a little harder to follow this in novel form as I had to keep reminding myself of all that wasn't yet known or was known. Like someone else said I hope Mr. Ellis got this difficult feat (which he did well with) out of his system. I'm now inspired to read some of his 'regular' work - I'm sure he's more than capable of writing plots that are just as ultimately satisfying as In The Company of Liars was.
Dalarin Dalarin
I generally don't like stories written backwards chronologically, but this was the last David Ellis book that I hadn't read, so I had to try it. About half way through I could see the wisdom of writing it in this fashion. I think in the hands of a lesser author, it wouldn't have worked, but it is very well written and developed. It's an intriguing story with many surprises as you move forward - really backward - that keeps the tension level high throughout the entire book. There were a couple of questions I had at the end (which would be the beginning of the book but the end of reading it) that I would have preferred were made clearer. I felt like I needed to find someone who had read it to discuss it with. But, as with all of Ellis' books, I was always interested and very glad I read it.
Sudert Sudert
This might quite literally be the most annoying book I've ever read. Now mind you - I bought this because I liked 2 other books by David Ellis so much. But this book starts off near the end of the story (a common thing, and one I don't generally object to), but then rather than reverting to the beginning of the story in the next chapter, each chapter steps back a day or two.
Every chapter.
For the whole book.
It's like reading a normal book starting with the last chapter, and moving on through to the beginning.

Now - some might say "it's a literary device!". "It's artistic!". "What? You can't follow a story in reverse you cretin?"

And to them I say: There's a reason that in the entire course of human history - most stories are told beginning to end. I'm not ashamed to tell you that this book makes my head hurt. Trying to decipher in each chapter what character has done what, knows what and will know what - in what order, is making me insane. I'm about 60% through the book, and am most likely going to just stop.

Because the other two David Ellis books I've read were so good - I will try another one - but avoid this one like the plague. Or go buy yourself some aspirin first...

Update 6/8/12: I feel like I gotta give this author some credit; while I stand by my original review of this particular book - I have since read 3 others by Mr. Ellis - and have thoroughly enjoyed them. They're interesting, I like the characters, and they tend to have unexpected endings which is awesome (I hate predictability in a book). So don't let the above review turn you off from David Ellis altogether - his other books are really great...
Rocky Basilisk Rocky Basilisk
This is the second of David Ellis' books that I've read and enjoyed this one as much as the first. The characters are interesting and developed so that you can identify with them. It is written in reverse order which made it challenging to read and remember from one chapter to the next. A very interesting concept. It took some concentration to keep the thread of the story going, but it was interesting enough that it was enjoyable to do so. He is one of the better writers and glad I found him.
Biaemi Biaemi
I found this book very frustrating due to it starting at the end and going backwards to the beginning. It took me a while to get into and only started appreciating this order towards the end of the book.