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eBook The Deadly Trade ePub

eBook The Deadly Trade ePub

by Ken Morris

  • ISBN: 1890862355
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Ken Morris
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bancroft Press; First Edition edition (March 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 366
  • ePub book: 1104 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1796 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf mobi mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 454

Description

The Deadly Trade: A Novel.

The Deadly Trade: A Novel. A former Wall Street executive, Morris here continues in the same vein as his first financial thriller, Man in the Middle. In San Diego, the police find three abandoned bodies covered with diseased.

The Deadly Trade by. Ken Morris

Ken Morris’s most popular book is Blind Allegiance to Sarah Palin: A Memoir of Our Tumultuous Years. The Deadly Trade by. Ken Morris.

The Deadly Trade book. Financial thriller pioneer Ken Morris has returned with a novel faster, scarier, and more current than even his highly-acclaimed debut, Man in the Middle. Tim Mack is a financial analyst running from a past full of death and drink. But when he leaves the Wall Street rat race hoping to slow down his life in San Diego, he finds that a calm and peaceful existence is just not Financial thriller pioneer Ken Morris has returned with a novel faster, scarier, and more current than even his highly-acclaimed debut, Man in the Middle.

Financial thriller pioneer Ken Morris has returned with a novel faster, scarier, and more current than even his .

Financial thriller pioneer Ken Morris has returned with a novel faster, scarier, and more current than even his highly-acclaimed debut, Man in the Middle. Kenny knows how to create detailed characters, dialogue that is both memorable and realistic, and an exciting plot about, "What if?" bioterrorism was knocking at our backdoor. My congradulation on this perfectly timed and ideally suited novel. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 15 years ago.

The Deadly Trade pulls on our own worst fears . Ken Morris has written two amazing thrillers, "Man in the Middle" & "The Deadly Trade". I'll probably read Morris' other book, but it will be towards teh bottom of my reading list. One person found this helpful.

The Deadly Trade pulls on our own worst fears, inspired by the news of yesterday and almost sure to make the headlines of tomorrow. The anthrax scare of 2001 pales in the light of Ken’s terrifying vision. He was the very best "honest" securities trader I've ever had the pleasure to work with.

Books related to The Deadly Trade.

A frightening, secret triumvirate of mass murder intricately combines a high-finance broker, a Middle-Eastern terrorist organization, and a dying biotechnology firm willing to do anything to keep afloat. Fast, scary, and very, very real.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. "e;Tim Mack is a financial analyst running from a past full of death and drink. But when he leaves the Wall Street rat race hoping to slow down his life in San Diego, he finds that a calm and peaceful existence is just not in the cards.

Find nearly any book by Ken Morris. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9781890862268 (978-1-890862-26-8) Softcover, Bancroft Press, 2003. Find signed collectible books: 'Man in the Middle'.

Written by Ken Morris, Audiobook narrated by Bill Lord. He teams up with Betsy O'Brien, his spunky and beautiful coworker; Joe Mack, his wheelchair-bound brother who's a former DEA agent; and Detective Bob Moore, an aging but tenacious cop in charge of leading the formal, but furtive, investigation. Together, they devise a plan to stop the release of the mutated virus.

"Tim Mack is a financial analyst running from a past full of death and drink. But when he leaves the Wall Street rat race hoping to slow down his life in San Diego, he finds that a calm and peaceful existence is just not in the cards. While researching a local biotechnology firm that has just exploded into flames, Tim begins to untangle a lethal web of deceit. A frightening, secret triumvirate of mass murder intricately combines a high-finance broker, a Middle-Eastern terrorist organization, and a dying biotechnology firm willing to do anything to keep afloat.How far will this alliance go? Tim soon finds out that a bug that ""makes AIDS look like a hangnail"" might only be the beginning. He teams up with Betsy O'Brien, his spunky and beautiful coworker; Joe Mack, his wheelchair-bound brother who’s a former DEA agent; and Detective Bob Moore, an aging but tenacious cop in charge of leading the formal, but furtive, investigation.Together, they devise a plan to stop the release of the mutated virus―a plan that brings the lives of Tim, his loved ones, and the rest of the country down to the bare wire."

Comments

Manemanu Manemanu
Ken Morris has written two amazing thrillers, "Man in the Middle" & "The Deadly Trade". He was the very best "honest" securities trader I've ever had the pleasure to work with. His brilliant razor-sharp mind could seemlessly understand the intricate relationships between complex arrays of variables. That rare skill combined with his extraordinary insider insights enables him to craft thrillers with amazingly complex plots that you won't be able to put down. If you love thrillers & you want to learn about Wall Street from a veteran's perspective, you owe it to yourself to read "Man in the Middle".
Huston Huston
Good read that offers an insight into the world of finance and germ warfare.
Owomed Owomed
About biotechnology being used for possible warfare; reads like an amateur's work.
MegaStar MegaStar
I think I picked this up as a recommendation from one of the economics weblogs I read. The recommendation suggested that the author was one of the few who included economics and finance as part of the setting. Despite being the dominant feature of the world today, economics is too frequently neglected in fiction. Unfortunately finance is present in this book, but doesn't add materially to the plot.

The book is solidly within the "Thriller" genre. Bad villians want to do despicable things, mostly because they are bad people. Pity, since I think the diversity of interests in the world provide adequte examples of evil. Unfortunately biowarfare is a bad choice for that kind of plotting, because there is a kind of deterrence in effect. Everything I've seen written says that biowarfare is ineffective at accomplishing strategic goals.

Finance comes into the book because the evil middle eastern General (whose name, cleverly is not Saddam Hussein) chooses to outsource his biowarfare development. He's got money, and US companies who are burning through their capital too quickly are more than happy to do his biowarfare testing. Evil General's research director is clever enough to divide the work among them so that they don't realize they're developing bioweapons. (Of course they do, but since they are professionals, and therefore not blue collar workers, they're all conservatives, and like all conservatives, they not only lack a conscience, but actively seek the opportunity to do evil at every opportunity. Those prep schools have a very demanding curriculum) Our Hero spots irregularities in the financing and that leads him to the shadowy world of international intrigue, populated by special forces soldiers, each of whom can take out a small third world country, but are utterly ineffectual against an alcoholic former swimmer.

I think I've got most of the cynicism out of my system now. I love international politics, but I stopped reading thrillers a few years ago because I was tired of the Hero vs Villian paradigm. The author is more fond of that paradigm than I am. The existence of a Hero forces all the characters in the book to be mere sketches without the depth or complexity that makes a book fun for me to read. The plot is a bit preachy; the author is clearly very concerned about bioweapons, and takes the opportunity to lecture about them regularly. Again, this diminishes my enjoyment of the book, particularly since the lectures ignore significant problems with bioweapon development. [Aside: One place where the author hits the nail on the head is that bioweapons is becoming a battle of symbols, where each side ignores significant elements of the other sides' arguments. The argument becomes one of symbols and language rather than a discussion of evidence, argument and conclusion.]

I did enjoy the finance. I wonder if an Evil General were to outsource research to the US, if they couldn't find a better way to hide their tracks. On that scale the book succeeds; I thought about the problems of finance, and about the lack of penetration of IT into the financial sectors of America. Quipping Dutchman and I had a long conversation about it, which may show up here, or in my other blog later.

I'll probably read Morris' other book, but it will be towards teh bottom of my reading list.
Redfury Redfury
From the first page to the last, I found suspense through this second book by Ken Morris strikes like lightening. In a treacherous theme that ties the stock market to bioterrorism, recovering alcoholic Tim Mack takes up a new position as a financial analyst for a high-finance broker, which he discovers is linked to a biotechnology company in San Diego that mysteriously explodes. Those first on the scene die shortly afterwards from unknown causes that suggest a lethal virus was unleashed during the blast. Just skimming through the chapters, the heading treatments reveal an accelerating plot rushing to beat a catastrophic deadline like the television series "24." Based on day-to-day and then hour-to-hour events, the novel opens on a street where the homeless live. Three men are promised $50.00 each if they can drink each other under the table at a party. This seduces them into a van that takes them to a lab where they are exposed to tainted air while eating porridge. The next day, local detective Bob Moore is faced with three John Doe bodies found together, and forensics can't figure out how they died such horrendous deaths. Is it murder or is it a sign of a 21st Century plague about to befall Californians?
At the same time, Mack begins his investigation into suspicious trading events of Isotopic Research, a drug company whose stock plunges after its research lab explodes and kills the scientists working inside. This sets up the plot that races to D-Day, Tuesday, February 6, in which Mack is trapped inside his firm's building where the deadly virus is to be launched and spread through the victims who inhale it, infect everyone who comes in contact with them and then die, thus killing thousands of people within 24 hours. The "anthrax test" must prove its intensified toxic power to Middle Eastern terrorists before they will pay for its delivery. Will Mack survive in time to save San Diego from a terrible disaster? It's a cliffhanger right up to the `reveal' of the unexpected mastermind behind the deadly drug deal.
Morris' vision of real possibilities is horrifying. It's also what makes his second novel a riveting page-turner.