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eBook Red Thunder (A Thunder and Lightning Novel) ePub

eBook Red Thunder (A Thunder and Lightning Novel) ePub

by John Varley

  • ISBN: 0441011624
  • Category: Thrillers and Suspense
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: John Varley
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ace (April 27, 2004)
  • ePub book: 1701 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1521 kb
  • Other: doc lrf docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 559

Description

John Varley is the author of the Gaean Trilogy (Titan, Wizard, and Demon), Steel Beach, The Golden Globe, Red Thunder, and Mammoth.

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). John Varley is the author of the Gaean Trilogy (Titan, Wizard, and Demon), Steel Beach, The Golden Globe, Red Thunder, and Mammoth. He has won both the Nebula and Hugo Awards for his work. Series: A Thunder and Lightning Novel (Book 1).

Red Thunder is a 2003 science fiction novel written by John Varley. The novel is an homage to the juvenile science fiction novels written by Robert A. Heinlein. In 2004, Red Thunder won the Endeavour Award and was nominated for the Campbell Award. Varley has written three sequels, Red Lightning (2006), Rolling Thunder (2008) and Dark Lightning (2014). The events of the books in the series are set approximately twenty years apart.

Seven suburban misfits are constructing a spaceship out of old tanker. Still, there's more than enough Right Stuff here to make Red Thunder worth reading, though long-time Varley fans may find the book a bit of a letdown. Better, perhaps, to ignore the famous name, and enjoy the tale for what it is, a fine, flawed, nostalgic remake of a childhood classic.

John Varley is the author of the Gaean Trilogy (Titan, Wizard, and Demon), Steel Beach, The Golden Globe, Red . Red Thunder, Том 1 A Thunder and Lightning Novel Series (Том 1) Ace book Ace science fiction Red Thunder.

John Varley is the author of the Gaean Trilogy (Titan, Wizard, and Demon), Steel Beach, The Golden Globe, Red Thunder, and Mammoth.

Debuting in 1974, John Varley became the decade's freshest, most exciting, and most important new science fiction author. In the highly anticipated new novel by John Varley, "one of the genre's most accomplished storytellers" (Publishers Weekly), a manned mission to Mars becomes a personal mission for an unlikely bunch of astronauts: seven suburban misfits who have constructed a spaceship built out of old tanker cars and held together with all-American ambition. They call her Red Thunder.

Used availability for John Varley's Red Thunder. April 2004 : USA Mass Market Paperback

Used availability for John Varley's Red Thunder. March 2003 : USA Hardback. April 2004 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

Red Lightning (Thunder a. .has been added to your Basket.

Items related to Red Thunder (A Thunder and Lightning Novel). Fans who feared Varley was devolving into another Robert A. Heinlein imitator may have mixed reactions to Red Thunder, Varley's first novel of the new millennium

Items related to Red Thunder (A Thunder and Lightning Novel). Varley, John Red Thunder (A Thunder and Lightning Novel). ISBN 13: 9780441011629. Red Thunder (A Thunder and Lightning Novel). Heinlein imitator may have mixed reactions to Red Thunder, Varley's first novel of the new millennium. Part of SF's turn-of-the-century trend of "Mars novels," but not part of Varley's Eight Worlds series, Red Thunder reads a lot like a Heinlein juvenile novel, if Heinlein were alive and writing juveniles in 2003.

Fanswho feared Varley was devolving into another Robert A. Heinlein imitator may have mixed reactions to Red Thunder, Varley’s first novel of the new millennium.

comDebuting in 1974, John Varley became the decade’s freshest, most exciting, and most important new science fiction author. He dominated the Seventies with numerous stories and two novels, set mostly in his Eight Worlds future history. Fanswho feared Varley was devolving into another Robert A. Part of SF’s turn-of-the-century trend of Mars novels, but not part of Varley’s Eight Worlds series, Red Thunder reads a lot like a Heinlein juvenile novel, if Heinlein were alive and writing juveniles in 2003.

Seven suburban misfits are constructing a spaceship out of old tanker cars. The plan is to beat the Chinese to Mars--in under four days at three million miles an hour. It would be history in the making if it didn't sound so insane.

Comments

Ucantia Ucantia
The first book in the Red Thunder series. As an homage to Robert Heinlein, Varley has done a wonderful job! Many little tropes and names of characters come from Heinlein's work. Manny (The Moon is a Harsh Mistress), Jubal "Stranger in a Strange Land", Podkayne (Podkayne of Mars) and themes from those and "The Rolling Stones (Rolling Thunder), along with the added thrill of Varley's rich reimaginings of Heinlein.
This is not a juvenile, but a coming of age that is full of adult issues and impact. These definitely follow through the series with each succeeding generation.
Golden Lama Golden Lama
I first picked up Red Thunder from the library, one of those cheap paperbacks for sale. I was looking for another book to grab for a trip and it looked mildly interesting. The first few chapters were slow, kids dreaming of being in space and finding a drunk on the beach, but I ended up loving the book. So much so that when a friend mentioned he hadn't read this, I sent it right along to him as a gift. I still have my battered copy, along with the next two (Red Lightning, Rolling Thunder) and have read them a couple times. That might be the best recommendation that I was willing to buy it for a friend to get him to read it. There are only 2-3 books I'd send in that way. I'm sure most people will find this book interesting.

It's a great journey, some kids deciding they want to head to Mars to rescue some astronauts that are destined for trouble. It's not too far in the future, and it's made possible by the squeezer.

The drunk is a former astronaut, his ex-wife still in the program and headed for Mars, but the discovery that his cousin, injured as a kid and seemingly mentally slow, has invented a squeezer that can create these bubbles. They can be any size, and you can squeeze them down to nothing. When you do that, you have a tremendous amount of energy. They find a way to make a discontinuity in the bubble and then they have an engine.

From there the kids set about building a rocket ship out of old railroad cars. They're on a race since the US ship heading towards Mars is in trouble and the Chinese have one that will beat it. They're trying desparately to ensure the US gets there first.

It's a great story, with rocket design principles mostly out the window due to the unlimited energy of the Squeezer, parents that don't want kids to go, Travis (the ex-astronaut) trying to keep things under control, a budget to deal with and more. It brings excitement, practicality, and fun to a sci-fi story.

I highly recommend this book, as well as the other two that follow.
Gtonydne Gtonydne
"Titan," this ain't.

John Varley's done some novels, most notably "Millennium" and the Gaia trilogy, that are full of Big Ideas and sprawling imagination. In contrast, "Red Thunder" is a popcorn movie, all concerned with fun and momentum forward.

Literally a novel about four friends who help assemble a homemade spaceship in an attempt to be the first people on Mars -- with the help of a disgraced ex-astronaut and his idiot savant cousin -- "Red Thunder" is a love letter to the Robert Heinlein "juvenile" novels about people pulling themselves up by the bootstraps of their moon boots and heading out into space for adventure.

And "Red Thunder" succeeds at that, handily, in fact. His physics, once you get over the giant deus ex machina at the heart of the revolutionary space drive, are pretty good. His realpolitik is excellent, and a bit more canny than Heinlein. And, for once, Varley doesn't emulate Heinlein at the end of his life, meaning this is his first novel in decades without strong (and often somewhat strange) sexual content.

This is a fun-for-all-ages, no deep thinking necessary adventure novel. Judged on its own merits, it's a definite success. Judged as part of the Varley canon, it feels like something he just knocked out for fun between bigger projects. I'm definitely looking forward to seeing his next big project, whatever it might be.

Strongly recommended for space adventure fans of all ages, especially readers of earlier Robert Heinlein novels.