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eBook Shotgun ePub

eBook Shotgun ePub

by Ed McBain

  • ISBN: 0340593393
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Ed McBain
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton (April 30, 1995)
  • Pages: 196
  • ePub book: 1687 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1203 kb
  • Other: lrf txt azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 416

Description

Ed McBain (October 15, 1926 – July 6, 2005) was an American author and screenwriter. Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952.

Ed McBain (October 15, 1926 – July 6, 2005) was an American author and screenwriter. While successful and well known as Evan Hunter, he was even better known as Ed McBain, a name he used for most of his crime fiction, beginning in 1956. He also used the pen names John Abbott, Curt Cannon, Hunt Collins, Ezra Hannon, and Richard Marsten, amongst others. His 87th Precinct novels have become staples of the police procedural genre.

Years later, when I actually got to meet Ed McBain/Evan Hunter, I told him this story, and he said, I would have liked it better if my books inspired you to become a detective instead of becoming my competition

Years later, when I actually got to meet Ed McBain/Evan Hunter, I told him this story, and he said, I would have liked it better if my books inspired you to become a detective instead of becoming my competition. Evan and I became friends, and I was privileged to know him and honored to be in his company.

Shotgun is another winner from Ed McBain in the 87th precinct series. The author has provided us with two rather perplexing murders, both of which seem to lack an abundance of clues, likely suspects, or any obvious solutions. In the first murder, a traveling salesman and his wife appear to have committed a murder-suicide with a shotgun. However, Detective Carella quickly observes a spent shell casing next to the man’s body where he lay holding the shotgun. As the weapon was a pump-action shotgun, Shotgun is another winner from Ed McBain in the 87th precinct series.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Shotgun by Ed McBain (Paperback, 1995) at the best . Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

Ed McBain was an American author and screenwriter. He was born in October 1926 and passed away in July 2005, at the honorable age of seventy-eight. He was born under the name Salvatore Albert Lombino, however he legally changed his name in 1952 to Evan Hunter. Despite this, he is far better known under the name Ed McBain, due to the fact that this is author title on his wildly successful collection of crime fiction novels. Ed McBain was a born and bred New Yorker. He was lived in Harlem, New York City from when he was born until he turned twelve. His family then moved to the Bronx.

Stephen King and Nelson DeMille on Ed McBain I think Evan Hunter, known by that name or as Ed McBain, was one of the most influential writers of the postwar generation.

Snow whips through the city’s streets like lethal daggers when a young actress leaves the theater after her latest performance. She walks home instead of taking the subway, and soon the snow on the ground is stained red with her blood. Stephen King and Nelson DeMille on Ed McBain I think Evan Hunter, known by that name or as Ed McBain, was one of the most influential writers of the postwar generation. He was the first writer to successfully merge realism with genre fiction, and by so doing I think he may actually have created the kind of popular fiction that drove the best-seller lists and lit up the American imagination in the years 1960 to 2000.

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Ed McBain - the complete book list. Ed McBain was the first American to receive the Diamond Dagger, the British Crime Writers Association's highest award.

Ed McBain - the complete book list. He also holds the Mystery Writers of America's coveted Grand Master Award, and received an Edgar Award nomination for his novel Money, Money, Money. His books have sold more than one hundred million copies, ranging from the more than fifty titles in his outstanding 87th Precinct series to the bestselling novels The Blackboard Jungle and Criminal Conversation, written under his own name, Evan Hunter. Book List:116 titles.

Comments

Tat Tat
I love Ed McBain. His books are serious, comic, irreverent and a joy to read. And its amazing the range he had with the 87th Precinct Books of which this is one — and the lawyer Matthew Hope to Blackboard Jungle, written as Evan Hunter.

This is the 12th in the percent books with all the usual characters -- working cops just trying to put away the bad guys. And they have come across an old nemesis they thought was dead. Steve Carella is dressed as a homeless man to catch teenagers who are setting homeless men on fire; he gets burned and he gets beat up. Meanwhile, the others on his team receive a threatening note that if someone is not paid $5,000, a commissioner will be killed -- and is. Then the note asks for more, to not kill the deputy mayor and in a spectacular bombing, he is killed. In the midst of all this the town of Isola is hit by one of the biggest storms in history, the police department is being painted by seemingly inept painters who spatter everything and finally, the cops come across an attempt to rob a tailor. And somehow, its at the tailor's where everything somehow comes to gather. Very much as you realize it probably happens for many crimes. The characters feel real and speak realistically, and you feel for them the whole time you're reading the book. Ed McBain/Evan Hunter was a genius. There are few authors I can say that for every time I open a book.
Liarienen Liarienen
I am biased but I find that all of Ed McBain's 87th Precinct novels are good and Fuzz is no exception. The earlier books are shorter and more succinct than the later ones. All of Mr. McBain's novels have two driving forces: great plots and great characters. I love the people of the 87th because they are so well written that I feel like I know them. Now Mr. McBain's plots remind me of Hill Street Blues before it got ruined. The 87th Precinct novels, when they start, give the impression that life started way before Page 1 and that life will continue after the Last Page. Ed McBain did not believe in wrapping up a novel into a neat little bow by the end. You know that cases had started before the major one and that cases will continue after, whether the main plot is done or not. Like Hill Street Blues's story arcs, these novels are called police procedurals for a reason. With the exception of the Deaf Man (the 87th's version of Professor Moriarty) and his nefarious machinations, all of the other cases, criminals, cops, snitches, etc. seem exceptionally real. The police procedures are real. The fact that every case is not solved is real. The fact that characters die is real. I love the people of the 87th. I want the criminals caught. I want the cops to succeed and survive. Ed McBain can be deep in his observations, conservative in his descriptions, generous in his dialogue, and humorous in everyday situations and even very dark ones. Are these novels everyone's cup of tea? No, no novel is, even those considered classic literature. I love these novels and one of my deepest regrets is that I never got to meet Evan Hunter before he passed away to thank him for the many, many hours of enjoyment I have realized from his work.
Kashicage Kashicage
I enjoyed this book and got to liking the characters, the men of the 87th. I wanted to read the book after seeing the movie that was based on it. Right off let me say they are two different animals. The movie is okay, but the book is way better. There are no big gun battles between the Cops and Robbers most of it is just following the leads to solve the crimes. In this story there are three crimes that happen: a case of murder and extortion, a case of somebody attacking the homeless, and a case of armed robbery. Three separate events that just happen to cross paths with each other. Just how I won't say so grab a copy and hit the streets with the 87th Precinct and get ready to outsmart the bad guys.
Ohatollia Ohatollia
In Fuzz, a master criminal nicknamed the Deaf Man returns to bedevil the detectives of the 87th Precinct. As is often the case in this series, the weather plays an important part in the book. It's the middle of winter; the snow is deep, and the temperatures are freezing. It's not fit weather for man or beast, but the criminals are not taking the winter off and so neither can the police.

In one particularly aggravating series of crimes, someone is pouring gasoline on sleeping homeless men and then setting them on fire. Detective Steve Carella goes under cover in order to catch the killers, but this means he's going to spend a lot of time freezing in alleys and doorways, playing bait for the attackers. It won't be any fun at all, and it's going to be a particularly frustrating assignment.

While Carella is thus occupied, someone calls the 87th Precinct and demands that he be paid $5,000 or he will shoot the Parks Commissioner. Almost everyone, including the Parks Commissioner, assumes the call is a prank. Sadly it isn't, and after the Parks Commissioner is shot and killed, the caller, who turns out to be the old nemesis of the 87th, the Deaf Man, steps up his game and puts the city in a panic.

All in all, this is a very entertaining read that should appeal to the legions of fans who follow this series.
Kalv Kalv
Number 22 in Ed McBain' s 87th Precinct series and, as usual, a good old-fashioned detective story read. Terse and often irrelevant exchanges draw the reader into the scene. Some of the exchanges seem completely inane, but when you get right down to it,are completely human and, often, humorous, intentionally or not. A goodly array of the 87th' s detectives parade in and out of the story line, each displaying the idiosyncrasies that make them such an entertaining group.
No Pulitzer prize for this novel, but a few enjoyable hours available to the fans of Mickey Spillane, John D MacDonald and, of course, Ed McBain.