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eBook The Last Train to Scarborough ePub

eBook The Last Train to Scarborough ePub

by Martin Andrew

  • ISBN: 0571229697
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Martin Andrew
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber; Main edition (March 5, 2009)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1323 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1574 kb
  • Other: azw mobi doc txt
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 872

Description

The sixth book in the Jim Stringer series, 2009. For all the people in the Quiet Carriage.

The right of Andrew Martin to be identified as author of this work. Andrew martin series: Jim Stringer. Other author's books: The Last Train to Scarborough. Death on a Branch Line. A CIP record for this book. ISBN 978-0-571-22969-7. Underground, Overground. Murder At Deviation Junction js-4. The Blackpool Highflyer.

Книга жанра: Детективы, Исторические детективы. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline.

For the past seven years, Andrew Martin has been throwing soot, sulphur and other steam-age .

For the past seven years, Andrew Martin has been throwing soot, sulphur and other steam-age effluvia about as background material for highly original railway murder mysteries and even murkier imaginings. We first met his delightfully dogged hero Jim Stringer as a fireman on The Necropolis Railway. Like all the Jim Stringer adventures, The Last Train to Scarborough bewitches with its detail, dry humour and laid-back ruminations, but the strangeness of the plot and the originality of the murder method puts this latest book into a weird class of its own. Topics.

The Last Train to Scarborough. One night, in a private boarding house in Scarborough, a railwayman vanishes, leaving his belongings behind. Author: Andrew Martin. A reluctant Jim Stringer is sent to investigate. It is March 1914, and Jim Stringer, railway detective, is uneasy about his next assignment. It’s not so much the prospect Scarborough in the gloomy off-season that bothers him, or even the fact that the last railwayman to stay in the house has disappeared without trace.

Claim the "The Last Train to Scarborough.

Daily Express' is an original voice and the historical novels are the best I have read this century. As a storm brews in Scarborough, it becomes increasingly unlikely that Jim will ever ride the train back to York. Crime dispatched with a Dickensian relish. Katherine A. Powers, Boston Globe. is an original voice and the historical novels are the best I have read this century.

Andrew Martin has a gift for clever description, and his characters display an interesting Dickensian quality (in the best . Aside from the railway detail which will appeal to train buffs, Andrew Martin knows this early twentieth century period well and this is where the novel shines.

Andrew Martin has a gift for clever description, and his characters display an interesting Dickensian quality (in the best sense). This title certainly contains many of the elements that make this series so excellent, but it gets off to an odd start with a sort of stream of consciousness chapter that is, to put it mildly, bewildering. The description of the places where the story is set is very realistic and the characters' attitudes are very true to the period, too. And the mystery will have you up half the night finishing it.

Start by marking The Last Train to Scarborough (Jim Stringer, Railway . The opening of the book certainly didn't grab my attention or make want to turn the pages faster and in fact it for me never really got going at all.

Start by marking The Last Train to Scarborough (Jim Stringer, Railway Detective, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Andrew Martin himself is a Yorkshireman, who studied at the University of Oxford and qualified as a barrister. He has had a career as both a freelance journalist, a non-fiction author, and has written works for television and radio as well as some other crime fiction including this series of novels. I managed about half the book and speed read the rest.

One night, in a private boarding house in Scarborough, a railwayman vanishes, leaving his belongings behind...

It is the eve of the Great War, and Jim Stringer, railway detective, is uneasy about his next assignment. It's not so much the prospect Scarborough in the gloomy off-season that bothers him, or even the fact that the last railwayman to stay in the house has disappeared without trace. It's more that his governer, Chief Inspector Saul Weatherhill, seems to be deliberately holding back details of the case - and that he's been sent to Scarborough with a trigger-happy assistant. And when Jim encounters the seductive and beautiful Amanda Rickerby a whole new personal danger enters Jim's life...

Comments

Buzatus Buzatus
Well...I'm reading the Jim Stringer series and just finished this one. While a fun read with interesting perspectives on the England of the early 1900s, the detecting leaves something to be desired. Stringer is given a task, but from there, he stumbles on things by accident or perpetrators give themselves away almost intentionally in order to complete the case. Bits and pieces are introduced which seem unnecessary and, overall, do not contribute to the flow of the story. Also, there is bountiful "filler" which, although interesting, is almost enough to complete another book.

Enough of the griping. The books are fun reads, this one included. Enough so, that I have started "The Somme Stations" (There should be an "underline text" option in this word processing app.). I'll see how this one fares.

READ THE BOOKS IN ORDER. This is not necessary, but the books make more sense if you do.
Windworker Windworker
I am not a regular reader of mysteries, and yet I love the Jim Stringer Railroad series. Andrew Martin has a gift for clever description, and his characters display an interesting Dickensian quality (in the best sense). This title certainly contains many of the elements that make this series so excellent, but it gets off to an odd start with a sort of stream of consciousness chapter that is, to put it mildly, bewildering. It all gets sorted out, eventually, and I suppose we could put it down to an indulgent experiment on the part of the author. I'm looking forward to #7 in the series, THE SOMME STATIONS. (Unfortunately, this series is published only in the UK so I'll look for a used copy on Amazon).

All-in-all, an easy four stars.
Usanner Usanner
This, the sixth in the series of Jim Stringer - Railway Detective novels is set in about 1911 and involves the disappearance of a railway engineer from a guest house in Scarborough, on the north east coast of England. While this is arguably one of the best mysteries yet in this series, Andrew Martin, the author, has chosen to begin the story at a point towards the end and then has what came before catch up bit by bit, a supposedly tantalising device but in reality rather irritating and unnecessary. Aside from the railway detail which will appeal to train buffs, Andrew Martin knows this early twentieth century period well and this is where the novel shines. The description of the places where the story is set is very realistic and the characters' attitudes are very true to the period, too. And the mystery will have you up half the night finishing it. Highly recommended!
Zamo Zamo
Another Jim Stringer period piece. I particularly enjoyed the inter-weaving of the industrial history of the North East with the actual story. While railways still underpin the story, coastal shipping is a big part of this story. As a further twist, women's sufferage is undercut with pornography.
from earth from earth
No review, just a great book if you like railroads and British detective stories.
Dorizius Dorizius
This compelling novel uses a double time frame - risky, but successful - and gives a satisfying resolution to a rather devilish but ultimately commonplace plot.
There are splendid evocations of an Edwardian seaside resort, including some fine depictions of local colour and of small scenes, which are very redolent of Dickens - a point made by other reviewers of the Stringer novels. The dialogue is pithy and engaging, and the narrative hooks you and won't let go.
Jim Stringer is a likeable central character, while his remarkable wife is a splendid literary creation.
An excellent novel, and an excellent and original series.
Sorryyy Sorryyy
This is a temporary review while I read the rest of the book. But I am doing so because I have just read the worst ever load of twaddle for an opening chapter in my life. One has not got a chance of working out what is really what; being rhetorical for a sec' - is the author indulging in poetic descriptions actually beyond his ability? Or is he really stuck in a coal-hole? I am not sure I want to find out, but, once I start a book I finish it so, time will tell.

As you can see, I have left the intermediate review up, purely for reasons of comparison / progress or lack thereof.

Ok, it soon become clear what's what plot and time frame wise. But, by the time the book livens up, it is done. This is not a good offering at all, I am sorry to say. I'm also a little mystified; some name reviewer has extolled the story's Dickensian character. Really? I didn't get anything in the least Dickensian / Victorian from this, nor should I have or anyone for that matter, it's in a different age. I at least will say the author has captured the times very well indeed, but that doesn't mean a book is automatically good, sadly. And this is not good.