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eBook A Mist of Prophecies (Roma Sub Rosa) ePub

eBook A Mist of Prophecies (Roma Sub Rosa) ePub

by Steven Saylor

  • ISBN: 1845292421
  • Subcategory: Suspense and Obscurity
  • Author: Steven Saylor
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Robinson Publishing (2001)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1407 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1835 kb
  • Other: txt mbr rtf lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 228

Description

A Mist of Prophecies book. Eighth in the Roma Sub Rosa ancient Roman historical mystery series and revolving around Gordianus the Finder and his family in the Rome of 48BC

A Mist of Prophecies book. Eighth in the Roma Sub Rosa ancient Roman historical mystery series and revolving around Gordianus the Finder and his family in the Rome of 48BC. Chronologically, it's MY eighth and Saylor's ninth or twelfth if you include the Ancient World books.

A Mist of Prophecies ( Roma sub Rosa - 9 ) Steven Saylor Steven Saylor A Mist of Prophecies Apollo, Apollo! . After the darkness of her speech. I go bewildered in a mist of prophecies. Aeschylus, Agamemnon 1080-82; 1112-13.

A Mist of Prophecies ( Roma sub Rosa - 9 ) Steven Saylor Steven Saylor A Mist of Prophecies Apollo, Apollo! Lord of the ways, my ruin You have undone me once again, an.

In the ninth book in Saylor's "Roma Sub Rosa" series of mysteries set in ancient Rome, Gordianus the Finder has now retired from his life as an. .

In the ninth book in Saylor's "Roma Sub Rosa" series of mysteries set in ancient Rome, Gordianus the Finder has now retired from his life as an investigator of crime and political intrigue and has settled into peaceful domesticity with his family. But his newfound tranquility is soon shattered by a series of events brought on by the continuing struggle between Julius Caesar and Pompey for supremacy over Rome. Immediately it is one of his best and most enjoyable works to date.

Roma Sub Rosa is the title of the series of historical mystery novels by Steven Saylor set in ancient Rome and populated by noteworthy denizens thereof. The phrase "Roma Sub Rosa" means, in Latin, "Rome under the rose". If a matter was sub rosa, "under the rose", it meant that such matter was confidential.

Rubicon rsr-7 (Roma sub Rosa Steven Saylor. Year Published: 2014. A Mist of Prophecies rsr-9 (Roma sub Rosa #9). Year Published: 2010. Year Published: 1997. Year Published: 2012. Year Published: 1994.

In A. The Judgment of Caesar (Roma Sub Rosa, For years now, the rival Roman generals Caesar and Pompey have engaged in a contest for world domination.

Thus ROMA SUB ROSA: the secret history of Rome, as seen .

Thus ROMA SUB ROSA: the secret history of Rome, as seen through the eyes of Gordianus. Steven Saylor’s engrossing series of popular novels centered around Gordianus the Finder - a kind of Roman Sherlock Holmes. Wall Street Journal). Saylor has acquired the information of a historian but he enjoys the gifts of a born novelist. A MIST OF PROPHECIES The death of a beautiful seeress and the wartime intrigues of Rome’s most powerful women propel Gordianus the Finder into a web of deceit, murder and forbidden passion. It would be impossible to imagine a more stellar lineup of suspects in all imperial Rome.

Roma Sub Rosa Series Steven Saylor.

Extraordinary acclaim for Steven Saylor's Roma Sub Rosa series RUBICON "Saylor provides historically accurate portrayals while never losing grasp of a captivating plot.

Extraordinary acclaim for Steven Saylor's Roma Sub Rosa series. A MIST OF PROPHECIES "It would be impossible to imagine a more stellar lineup of suspects in all imperial Rome. RUBICON "Saylor provides historically accurate portrayals while never losing grasp of a captivating plot. His mysteries evolve with intelligent turns and vivid imagination.

A Mist of Prophecies is a historical novel by American author Steven Saylor, first published by St. Martin's Press in 2002. It is the ninth book in his Roma Sub Rosa series of mystery stories set in the final decades of the Roman Republic. The main character is the Roman sleuth Gordianus the Finder. The year is 48 BC, and there is civil war in the Roman Empire. In Rome, the beautiful and mysterious seeress called Cassandra is poisoned, and dies in the arms of Gordianus in the market.

Comments

Jairani Jairani
We're used to Gordianus being perfect. He doesn't have sex outside marriage, doesn't drink or eat to excess, is always very serious, professional, etc. Well, in this book he is seduced by a woman, and for the first time in his life, he has secrets from his family.

In a way I understood, Bethesda was sick, and his family were driving him crazy. There's violence in the forum and they want him to stay home all day, and there are debts piling up.

The story was fascinating, another great whodunit that was totally unpredictable, and unlike Last Seen In Massilia, not a disappointed when you discovered who the killer was.
Thofyn Thofyn
I'm a big fan of Saylor's Gordianus series and gladly give four or five stars to the other "Roma sub rosa" books. But this one volume in the series is a disappointment on several counts. First, Gordianus starts an affair that's totally out of character for him, as a person who's normally all about truth and integrity. Second, the book is written in alternating chapters that jump between two timelines in a very jarring way; it's a dumb literary device that detracts from Saylor's skill as a writer. Third, the plot isn't much fun, it's just Gordianus visiting a series of potential suspects until things fall into place.

Last but not least, the Kindle edition of this book is overflowing with appalling (and sometimes hilarious) typos due to poor text recognition software. Clearly no attempt was made to clean it up with even the most basic spelling checks. I know that's not Saylor's fault, but there's no good place to point it out except in a review. The fact is that Amazon's Kindle versions of books often do a disservice to their authors and readers, and Amazon should be ashamed to be charging normal paperback prices for digital books of such poor quality.

I wish I could just say, "skip this book," but aspects of it carry over to the next one, The Judgment of Caesar -- and that volume is excellent, so it would be a shame to miss the background you need to fully enjoy it.
Raelin Raelin
Torn about this book. I very much enjoyed seeing all the women of Rome, the power behind the scenes. The timing is perfect because all the men are off doing Civil War things and so the women are left in more control than usual at least openly. I however very much disliked Gordianus in this entry. The mystery itself was nicely tied up with a couple blinds that I missed, probably because I was so annoyed with the way the Finder was acting.
Coiriel Coiriel
For those long-time fans of Saylor's Roma Sub Rosa mysteries, "A Mist of Prophecies" is a deeply satisfying return after several years' gap between it and Saylor's "Last Seen in Massilia."
The shocking conclusion of Massilia is referenced, but Gordianus' problems with his own family take backstage to the chaos of Rome during Civil War. Both Pompey and Caesar have moved east to the ultimate battle between them for control of the Roman world. Left behind, the capitol seethes in financial collapse, rumor, and fear. Into this, a beautiful, half-mad seeress, Cassandra, explodes into Gordianus' life. Dying in his arms in the Forum, we then backtrack through Gordianus' meetings with her and her involvement in the intrigues taking place in the paranoid world in which Caesar and Pompey, far away, are determining Rome's future. In discovering why she died, we meet some of Rome's most famous women, each of whom may be a suspect and each of whom is deeply involved with the desperate civil struggle playing out all around them.
The women are sketched with particular vividness. We have met Fulvia and Clodia before in earlier novels. I particularly enjoyed Caesar's wife, Calpurnia, whose small but highly memorable part in the mystery makes her far more interesting than the little that is known from history. Old friends Milo and Caelius also help turn the plot.
Saylor easily balances the personal woes of Gordianus with the the larger canvas of war and intrigue. I found it consistently satisfying and, in its surprise ending, I suspect we may look forward to the next in the series as a completely different change of pace.
Although I missed actually seeing Caesar and Cicero in the novel (both are in the East), this is a fun, refreshing, and energetic read and - as always with Saylor - you will learn something about Rome. Enjoy it!
wanderpool wanderpool
"Mist of Prophecies" is the latest installment of Steven Saylor's Sub-Rosa series. Immediately it is one of his best and most enjoyable works to date. The book is good enough to be read on it's own but is best enjoyed by checking out the previoius 2 novels, "Rubicon" and "Last Seen In Massalia", (Checkout the great review by the reviewer Booksforabuck.) Changed by the vicissitudes of time, we see our protagonist, Gordianus the Finder older and more worldly and confronted with the tragic death of his intriguiging lover Cassandra. A seeress of unknown origin who dies in his arms and who's prophecies were urgently sought after by some of Rome's leading matrons. At the funeral, no one attends except the very same group of women observing the funeral rite from a discrete distance. Here is an excellent view at the behind-the-scenes look at the feminine Roman mindset. There are numerous flashbacks that reveals the plot and Gordianus' state of mind in an interesting way that is at once personal and prosaic. Notice, as we age it is natural to reminisce and Gordianus does that in a such a way to make his dilemma of loss and pain all the more real and convincing. Looking back at the past plots from the earlier books (makes you want to re-read, the Venus Throw and Murder On The Appian Way), brings Mist of Prophecies in sharp focus to the state of affairs in Rome, (the fall of the Republic) and the rise of Ceasar.
The similarities between ancient Rome and our world and are so close that there is much to consider; economic upheavals with a poplulation deep in debt, war, rogue politicians causing trouble and plenty of grandstanding and intrigue to keep you awake at night. A must read. Enjoy!