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eBook The End: 50 Apocalyptic Visions From Pop Culture That You Should Know About...Before It's Too Late ePub

eBook The End: 50 Apocalyptic Visions From Pop Culture That You Should Know About...Before It's Too Late ePub

by Jill Buck,Laura Barcella

  • ISBN: 0982732252
  • Category: Education and Reference
  • Subcategory: Teens
  • Author: Jill Buck,Laura Barcella
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Zest Books (July 24, 2012)
  • Pages: 176
  • ePub book: 1856 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1846 kb
  • Other: docx azw txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 868

Description

information about the apocalyptic theory behind it (from alien invasion to meteors, nuclear war, and natural disasters)

information about the apocalyptic theory behind it (from alien invasion to meteors, nuclear war, and natural disasters). an explanation about why this work is important in pop culture. before it's too late.

The End is a fun, comprehensive, pop culture read about the 50 top movies, books, songs, comics, artworks, and plays - from the movie Shaun of the Dead to the pop song It’s the End of the World as We Know It - that have been created about the apocalypse. Each item includes: A synopsis of the apocalyptic workInformation about the apocalyptic theory behind it (from alien invasion to meteors, nuclear war, and natural disasters)An explanation about why this work is important in pop cultureLove doomsday talk and the art that is made about it? Check out this fun and entertaining read!

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The End : 50 Apocalyptic Visions from Pop . This fun, fact-filled book explains 50 doomsday scenarios, just in time for 2012

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The End : 50 Apocalyptic Visions from Pop Culture That You Should Know About. This fun, fact-filled book explains 50 doomsday scenarios, just in time for 2012. Each of the entries takes a movie, song, comic, or other artwork, and explains what it is and why it matters - because while the end may be nigh, when it comes to pop culture, the apocalypse is here to stay. Fun illustrations are also included.

book by Laura Barcella. You’ve probably heard rumors that the end of the world is going to happen in the year 2012.

The End is a fun pop culture read about the top 50 movies, books, songs, and artworks-from the movie Shaun .

The End is a fun pop culture read about the top 50 movies, books, songs, and artworks-from the movie Shaun of the Dead to the song It's the End of the World as We Know It-about the apocalypse. Each item includes: - A synopsis of the apocalyptic work - Information about the apocalyptic theory behind it (from alien invasion to meteors, nuclear war, and natural disasters) - An explanation about why this work is important in pop culture Love doomsday talk and the art made about it? Check out this fun and entertaining read!

The End is a fun, comprehensive, pop culture read about the 50 top movies, books, songs, comics, artworks, and plays-from the movie Shaun of the Dead to the pop song "It's the End of the World as We Know It"-that have been created about the apocalypse

The End is a fun, comprehensive, pop culture read about the 50 top movies, books, songs, comics, artworks, and plays-from the movie Shaun of the Dead to the pop song "It's the End of the World as We Know It"-that have been created about the apocalypse. Each item includes: a synopsis of the apocalyptic work. information about the apocalyptic theory behind it (from alien invasion to meteors, nuclear war, and natural disasters). an explanation about why this work is important in pop culture

In her introduction, Barcella notes it was .

In her introduction, Barcella notes it was "overwhelmin. aving to narrow the list down to just fifty," but offers no insight into how she arrived at her final list. Her sole criterion for selection seems only to be that they are "iconic. s song "It's the End of the World" and the film When Worlds Collide are obvious selections, but there are many interesting surprises. Who knew authors as different as . Forster, Jack London and Mary Shelley all wrote apocalyptic short stories and novels? Most people listening to Nena's "99 Luftballons" today probably don't realize it's about the Cold War–era shadow of nuclear annihilation.

She also wrote "The End: 50 Apocalyptic Visions From Pop Culture That You Should Know About. Before It's Too Late" (Zest Books, 2012) and "Madonna & Me: Women Writers on the Queen of Pop" (Soft Skull Press, 2012). Her freelance writing has appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, GQ, TIME, Marie Claire, VanityFair. com, ELLE, Esquire, Cosmopolitan, and more.

It is a great book for children 12 or older and parents to talk about around the dinner table. A fun way to learn about different things you never thought about before. A must read for all! I was given this book from Zest Books ww. estbooks.

com and on Twitter at abarcella.

Youâ?™ve probably heard rumors that the end of the world is going to happen in the year 2012. But people have been making predictions about how and when the world is going to end for ages. The End is a fun, comprehensive, pop culture read about the 50 top movies, books, songs, comics, artworks, and playsâ?”from the movie Shaun of the Dead to the pop song "Itâ?™s the End of the World as We Know It"â?”that have been created about the apocalypse. Each item includes:

a synopsis of the apocalyptic work

information about the apocalyptic theory behind it (from alien invasion to meteors, nuclear war, and natural disasters)

an explanation about why this work is important in pop culture

Love doomsday talk and the art that is made about it? Check out this fun and entertaining read!

Comments

Whiteflame Whiteflame
This is a very interesting book, it gives you important information that, everybody should know about the end of the world
CopamHuk CopamHuk
This is such a great book to leave out on your coffee table or office. Guaranteed, to grab someone's attention and regularly keeps me amused. I love a good apocalypse story and this book digs up references and fine art that I'd never seen before. So fun.
Briciraz Briciraz
The End is a fun facts that you should know about, Very well written with each page containing a picture of subject, unforgettable moment, reality factor, the inspiration, the impact, quotable, and more movies directed by. There are 50 apocalyptic visions from pop culture that you should know about... before it's too late.

I want to give you an example of one called Children of Men (2006);
Unforgettable Moment
At the start of the movie, clusters of somber, scared-looking Brits squeeze into a storefront to catch the news, blaring from an overhead TV screen. Eighteen-year-old Baby Diego- the youngest person left on the planet--has been stabbed to death in a bar brawl. The onlookers' horrified reaction to the news is less about the dead young man and more about what his death represents: Any hope for the future is gone.

Inspiration
The title of both book and film were inspired by the Bible. The phrase "children of men" comes from verse three of Psalm 90: "Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men." Most believe that the first part means that mankind will be wiped out by God because of humans' grave propensity to sin. The second part ("and sayest, Return, ye children of men") is interpreted different ways. Some believe that the "return" is simply man's return to dust; others believe the "return" here signifies that Christ will call those who repent to resurrection after the destruction. Either way, it can be seen as an end-of-times, apocalyptic reference.

The Impact;
The movie offered a haunting vision of what a world without children would look like. Though the movie's chase scenes and shoot-outs are intense to begin with, the film's violence is even more visually arresting due to the flat grey landscapes it's set in. the lack of youth, laughter, and sunlight echo the lack of hope in the population as a whole.

Quotable

"As the sound of the playgrounds faded, the despair set in. Very odd, what happens in a world without children's voices."
Miriam's observation as she, Theo, and Kee hide from police inside a school.

It is a great book for children 12 or older and parents to talk about around the dinner table. A fun way to learn about different things you never thought about before. A must read for all!

I was given this book from Zest Books [...]
Faugami Faugami
Laura Barcella's book does a good job of covering ends of the world, from the First Century "Revelation of John the Divine" to 21st Century world-endings like WALL-E. She also covers a wide range of media, including not only films and books but also stage plays and popular songs like "Eve of Destruction" and "Gimme Shelter".
I do have to question some of her choices: The world doesn't actually end in "V for Vendetta", for instance, and while a dozen worlds die in "Battlestar Galactica", none of them is our world. And how could she mention a forgettable song like "The End of the World As We Know It" (only barely qualified by the popularity of the title as a catchphrase) and leave out "Hard Rain" (which Bob Dylan wrote during the Cuban Missle Crisis to represent all of the songs he wouldn't live to write) or "Bad Moon Rising"?
I appreciate the "Reality Check" Barcella includes for each Armageddon (nuclear war or giant meteor impact rated more likely than a male-killing plague or zombies), but she slips up there, too: she seems to think that the coincidence of disasters makes for an unlikely apocalypse, when in fact a "perfect storm" of, say, nuclear war and plague, or civil disorder and famine, is exactly the sort of thing that could push a civilization over the brink. Pestilence, Famine and War are all too deadly and all too likely a combination.
And how could she review Alan Moore's "Watchmen" and mention the threat posed by Dr. Manhattan and an alien invasion but not the looming threat of nuclear war which was the overarching theme of the series? That omission is really mind-boggling.
Overall, though, it's a lovely assortment of extinction-level events to choose from.
Coirad Coirad
Society has a morbid fascination with the end of the world. And really, who can blame them? I certainly can't since I'm one of the many morbidly curious.

The End is a look at pop culture's many dooms day predictions, and how they continue to influence the masses and media. There were many pieces I had never heard about, or only had a vague concept of, and it was interesting to see how they connected to other more current works. I do have to admit that as a zombie fan, I was wanting them represented a bit more, but I'm sure I could come up with at least 50 pieces for them alone!

This was a pretty quick read, with each piece of work broken down into a summary, Inspirations for the piece, unforgettable moments, reality factor, and the impact it has had on our culture. The Kindle formatting I received through Net Galley did make it difficult to read, but I notice that at this time it's only available in paperback, which I think would be cool to see, as there are photos to go with each 'vision'. This is definitely a fun look at pop culture!
Mojar Mojar
I love "The End"! This book is super fun to read and has a ton of information, too. It counts down movies, books, plays, songs, etc. that were created about the apocalypse. But the author goes beyond just creating a huge list--she gives you the inspiration for the pop culture work and its impact on our world today. I never realized how much our culture focuses on the apocalypse, but "The End" made me realized just how obsessed we are. If you want a book that's fun and informative, "The End" is a good choice.