cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » thinandbeautiful.com
eBook thinandbeautiful.com ePub

eBook thinandbeautiful.com ePub

by Liane Shaw

  • ISBN: 1897187629
  • Category: Literature and Fiction
  • Subcategory: Teens
  • Author: Liane Shaw
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Second Story Press (September 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 216
  • ePub book: 1125 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1419 kb
  • Other: doc txt lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 771

Description

We always had a million things to talk about READ BOOK: Thinandb.

We always had a million things to talk about READ BOOK: Thinandbeautiful. Com by Liane Shaw online free. Online reading Thinandbeautiful. You can read book Thinandbeautiful. Com by Liane Shaw in our library for absolutely free.

Read "Thinandbeautiful.

Liane Shaw is the author of five YA books, all of which feature teens facing diverse challenges. Before she began writing books for teens, Liane Shaw was an elementary teacher. She also wrote a memoir of her time teaching children with emotional challenges. Caterpillars can't swim. With little in the way of experience or resources, she found herself thrust into the most challenging kind of teaching imaginable.

Liane Shaw is the author of thinandbeautiful Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Liane Shaw's books.

Liane Shaw is the author of thinandbeautiful  . Discover new books on Goodreads.

Before she began writing books for teens, Liane Shaw was an elementary teacher.

Seventeen-year-old Maddie has always felt a hole in her life, but she has finally found a way to fill it with her quest to mold her body into her ideal, thinnest shape.

Liane Shaw has worked in education for twenty-five years, with much of that time spent as a teacher of students who face academic, behavioral, physical or emotional challenges. Her own battle with anorexia inspired her to write this story.

com book by Liane Shaw. Seventeen-year-old Maddy has always felt a hole in her life, but she has finally found a way to fill it with her quest to mold her body into her ideal, thinnest shape.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Renee Lane does not write with quite the introspective elegance of Sacher-Masoch, but she writes well enough, and she definitely gets her point across. If Masoch is a crop, Ms. Lane is a cane. The scenes with her and Butler are the high points, and that rabbit hole just gets deeper and longer.

To provide Ruby Lane customers and shop owners with the highest quality of products and services, we require all shops to meet our quality standards: General. working phone number. Ruby Lane does not tolerate the usage of false names or virtual identities to transact business on the Site.

Seventeen-year-old Maddy has always felt a hole in her life, but she has finally found a way to fill it with her quest to mold her body into her ideal, thinnest shape. When she comes across the world of "pro-ana" websites, where young people encourage each other in their mission to lose ever more weight, she realizes she is no longer alone. Finally, she has found a place where she is understood. Maddy quickly becomes addicted to the support and camaraderie she finds on thinandbeautiful.com. Now in a rehab facility where they are trying to "fix" a problem she doesn't think she has, Maddy's diary entries trace how she arrived at this point. Angry that she is barred from accessing her online friends, only the tragic consequences that come to one of her comrades in arms is enough to shock her into admitting that she does need help. Liane Shaw has worked in education for twenty-five years, with much of that time spent as a teacher of students who face academic, behavioral, physical or emotional challenges. Her own battle with anorexia inspired her to write this story.

Comments

kolos kolos
It was a great book about a girl with an eating disorder and it took you through her with her revovery
Castiel Castiel
Grade: C-

After reading an ARC copy of Liane Shaw's thoughtful novel THE COLOR OF SILENCE, I was eager to see read THINANDBEAUTIFUL.COM, hoping to find the same subtle insight and sensitivity. Instead, narrator Madison is self-centered, unfriendly and without depth. Maddie is superficial, and while on the surface eating disorders may seem superficial, they are mental illnesses about the underlying issues of trauma, low self esteem, depression, anxiety, family dysfunction and/or a whole host of other issues that have nothing to do with eating, food and weight.

On the surface Maddie seemed to have it all, brains, looks, friends and a family who loved her. She believes her mother and Doctor think she's fat and that her life will be better if she loses weight. Fair enough. She's studied eating disorders in school and knows that pro-anorexia websites are dangerous, yet she finds a site where girls encourage each other to diet and claim they don't have eating disorders. My understanding of such sites is that anorexia is a goal, a badge of honor of sorts, although the girls on this site seem to believe they just want to be thin. Okay, maybe Shaw decided to go with this theory. Instead of being in denial, Madison seemed more clueless, lacking all insight. Not only was Maddie not introspective, but she was overtly unkind to her family and friends, especially her best friend.

The treatment center bore no resemblance to any psych hospital or eating disorder treatment facility that would be licensed to operate in the USA. Everything from eating to attending groups was voluntary. Madison didn't have a roommate, possible in some more upscale centers, but she was allowed to stay in her room all day and write in her journal. She wasn't even requires to go to the cafeteria for meals. Shaw could have done better research about the types of therapies that structure inpatient hospitalizations.

The ending was beyond clichéd. Can there be a book about eating disorders without a Big Event that causes the main character to have a proverbial lightbulb go off in her head and develop an instantaneous desire to embrace recovery?

THEMES: friendship, mental health, eating disorders, anorexia, bulimia, family, friendship

THINANDBEAUTIFUL.COM is a forgettable story of a teenager resisting recovery from anorexia in a treatment facility.
Rko Rko
This was a wonderful book. I really enjoyed it a lot. It was complex, without making the reader work too hard to get into the story. Most of all, I enjoyed the fact that it was not your typical e.d. sort of book. There was a bit more to it. And, I particularly enjoyed the surprise, that came later on in the book. (I'll avoid saying more, as not to spoil it for potential readers ????) This one is definitely recommended.
Hasirri Hasirri
Maddie considers herself pretty normal. At the age of eleven, she began thinking, and yes, worrying, about her appearance. But aren't most girls concerned about things like hair, make-up, and weight? It may have been that visit to the doctor for a physical that got the problem started.

It was a routine sports physical. After the exam and Maddie was back in her clothes, the doctor came into the room to chat. Part of the conversation was a warning from him that girls her age need to start watching what they eat so they don't put on "unwanted" pounds.

Those words stayed with Maddie, and as her desire to create the perfect figure began to occupy more of her thoughts, those words may have urged her to go way beyond what was healthy and wise.

Most of [...] involves Maddie writing about herself and confronting the fact that she is suffering from an eating disorder. She has many people who offer her support, but recognizing whose support she should seek is difficult.

Her family and school friends are ready to do whatever is necessary, but she is drawn to an online chat group known as Girls Without Shadows. Their belief is that they have the right to do what they want to their bodies in their desire to be thin and beautiful. The idea of eating disorders does not exist for them.

Author Liane Shaw presents the all too common problems of anorexia and bulimia in stark detail as she helps Maddie tell her story. The excuses and denial typical of those with eating disorders is made plain for all to see. Anyone suffering with one or both of these disorders, or anyone who knows someone who is, will benefit from reading Maddie's story.

Reviewed by: Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky"