cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Zero
eBook Zero ePub

eBook Zero ePub

by Tom Leveen

  • ISBN: 0375869212
  • Category: Literature and Fiction
  • Subcategory: Teens
  • Author: Tom Leveen
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (April 24, 2012)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1341 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1427 kb
  • Other: txt lrf mbr rtf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 371

Description

Tom Leveen's writing is so readable. Great dialogue, smart characters in real settings. Zero would be a great book for people that enjoy books about new adults, people who don't fit in, and fans of art, music and romance

Tom Leveen's writing is so readable. Mr. Leveen builds the story so well, it is hard to put down. It is so refreshing to read positive descriptions of teenagers. So much literature for YA is depressing. Zero would be a great book for people that enjoy books about new adults, people who don't fit in, and fans of art, music and romance. Don't judge this book by its cover - there is a lot more beneath the surface.

Tom Leveen writes a realistic teenage girl character, one who is self-absorbed and a bit whiny, and dealing with lots of family drama. Zero would be a great book for people that enjoy books about new adults, people who don't fit in, and fans of art, music and romance

Tom Leveen writes a realistic teenage girl character, one who is self-absorbed and a bit whiny, and dealing with lots of family drama. Amanda's nickname Zero started out as a put-down junior high kids called her because she was the loner art chick.

Zero is a witty, engaging story of self-discovery. This was my first Tom Leveen book, but I’m definitely anxious to pick up Party now, and look forward to more from hi. .previous 1 2 3 4 5 next .

Dr. Salinger says as she floats into the room. We’re used to it by now. Half the class has dropped out, while the rest of us just consider it free studio time when she doesn’t show. Half the class has dropped out, while the rest of us just consider it free studio time when she doesn’t show t out enough Moody Art Chick vibes to keep the old broads from trying to talk to me, so I can paint in peace. And I’ve got a good one here. Sketched it out first and everything. I mean, I think it’s promising; it’s better than the last few, anyway. I spent the most incredible evening with Lourdes St. James!

Read online books written by Tom Leveen in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Shackled, Random, Zero at ReadAnyBook.

Read online books written by Tom Leveen in our e-reader absolutely for free.

Последние твиты от Tom Leveen (eveen) We go live in one hour to critique my first novel ZERO (or the . Tabatha Shipley Ретвитнул(а) Tom Leveen. Aaaahhhhh friends this book is AMAZING!!! Go get yourself this audiobook.

Последние твиты от Tom Leveen (eveen). author at imprints of Penguin Random House, Abrams, and Simon & Schuster. Stoker Award finalist. We go live in one hour to critique my first novel ZERO (or the first page of the first draft). com/authortomleveen pi. witter. 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

Brian and his friends are not part of the cool crowd. Who's the real victim here? This tense and gripping exploration of cyberbullying and teen suicide is perfect for fans of Before I Fall and Thirteen Reasons Why. They're the misfits and the troublemakers-the ones who jump their high school's fence to skip class regularly.

I’ve been wanting to start a novel with the line It’s about a girl for a long time. Now, with manicpixiedreamgirl, I can cross that off my list. man, everything was about a. man, everything was about . ore about Tom Leveen. Category: Teen & Young Adult Fiction Teen & Young Adult Romance Teen & Young Adult Social Issues. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Also in Teen & Young Adult Fiction.

For aspiring artist Amanda Walsh, who only half-jokingly goes by the nickname Zero, the summer before college was supposed to be fun—plain and simple. Hanging out with her best friend Jenn, going to clubs, painting, and counting down the days until her escape. But when must-have scholarship money doesn't materialize, and she has a falling out with Jenn that can only be described as majorly awkward, and Zero's parents relationship goes from tense to relentless fighting, her prospects start looking as bleak and surreal as a painting by her idol Salvador Dali. Will life truly imitate art? Will her new, unexpected relationship with a punk skater boy who seems too good to be real and support from the unlikeliest of sources show Zero that she's so much more than a name.

Comments

Ndav Ndav
My first impression of Zero, the character, as well as "Zero" the book: Snarky, sarcastic, and thoroughly teen drama.
Second impression (one chapter later): OMG, this is ME! Without the art angle (mine was theatre) or the punk angle (mine was goth), but it's ME!

Here's the thing:

I didn't know Tom Leveen existed until Phoenix Comicon 2014 (that would be this last June). Never heard of him, never heard of his books, didn't know he did seminars and classes, nada. But... I'm a writer, I want to be a better writer, and he had not one but TWO panels that weekend about writing, so I thought, "The hell. Why not? If he's good, then I'll learn something. If he's not, then I'll take a nap or eat lunch, or just walk out."
Hol. Ly. Crap. The man is like a talking hamster on caffeine, but he knows his s***. I nearly tore up my notebook pages scribbling down notes. Truly insightful, and better yet, applicable. Love the guy.
Then, during his final panel on Sunday, he does a frigging GIVEAWAY. "Come down to my table and I'll give you a free copy of one of my books," he says, "if you promise to write a real, honest-to-goodness review on Amazon."
Cus apparently, Goodreads has a rep for crappy reviewers. I tried not to take that personally.
So I beeline down to his table and get a copy of "Zero," a story about a recent high school graduate who THOUGHT her life was going one direction, until a letter from her chosen art school, and then a mysterious incident with her former best friend, yank her dreams right out from under her, and in a pity party fit of self-loathing, ends up at a club concert where she meets a drummer with the most INCREDIBLE eyes... and gets sucked into his world.
As Leveen phrased it during his panels, this story deals with the question "should you give up your dreams for the dreams of someone you love?"
That pulled on my little heart strings as soon as he said it, which is why I picked "Zero" as my freebie rather than the more Clue-esque "Party" or the more obsessive-teen "Manic Pixie Dream Girl."
I'll get to those eventually, though.

Here's the thing:

There's two reasons I like this book, why I gave it four out of five.
First, Leveen has this way of saying things that smells strongly of Markus Zusak, author of "The Book Thief." Example: "Their acidic words burn right through the walls, as usual." Also, "Clouds roll by fast overhead, purple-gray animals growling and flashing teeth." Anyone here in AZ who has seen a monsoon knows exactly what he's describing. I love figurative language like that; it's one of the things I want to be able to do effortlessly in my own writing.
Second, the sheer franticness of the book clearly portrays the teen life. Everything is a big deal, everything is life or death. Everything happens to you at race-car speed, and your emotions ricochet around your head and body just as fast. Decisions are impulsive, gut-wrenching, words are spit out as soon as they enter your head, and crises are always the end of the world. There is no such thing as taking a deep breath and looking at a thing calmly, to wait for the opportune moment. Your life is lived in the reactive. Leveen captures this dynamic perfectly, to the point that when he writes something so completely TEENAGE GIRL, I kind of sat there and thought, "How does he KNOW?!"

I also loved his use of italics to throw out "important" sounding words, which only further conveyed Zero's sarcasm.

I lived Zero's life with her, groaning at her mishaps, hurting at her disappointments, cheering with her victories, and especially wallowing in the social/dating awkwardness quite common to us artistically driven nerds. And then, come the end, when she's presented with two things she wants, but cannot have both, I anguished with her in the decision, and actually disagreed with her.
But that's the point, is it not? I may not think the character made the right decision, but it was ultimately satisfying for the character. If the book had ended the way I thought it would, the way I would have done it (because I'm different than Zero), it wouldn't be true to ZERO's character. This sort of juxtaposition raises questions about our own motivations, our own goals, our own failed dreams. It subversively twists us into asking why we abandoned them for something else.

I say give this one a shot. There might be a lot of art references for those "in the know," but for those of us no, it doesn't matter. The core of the story is the same; the message still applies. It just makes us a little more curious about something not previously on our radar.
Support your local authors!
Naril Naril
Zero has picked the perfect nickname for herself, because that's what she is: nothing. Especially after graduation, everything Zero had going for her was lost. Her scholarship for the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SIAC) flopped due to a lack of "technical proficiency," she's just lost her best-slash-only friend, and the arguments between her parents are getting worse every day. She wants to go to SIAC more than anything, but any artist knows how hard it is to create with so much self-doubt and outside anxiety. Luckily, meeting the cute drummer of an up-and-coming punk band might just be the outside perspective she needs to view her life from a new angle.

Tom Leveen has become a favorite author of mine, and although this is one of his earlier works, still proved itself to be a smooth and engrossing read. Leveen did not shy away from serious topics, making for a serious yet fun read that was quick-paced and filled with interesting characters. Each character had their own share of personal demons to deal with, which went along well with the theme that fear and anxiety can keep anyone from improving their lives—not just artists. To be honest, though, the book started out a little slow for me. In the beginning chapters, Zero's voice felt too forced into the angsty teen state, like Leveen was trying too hard to imitate a "real" teen voice. This problem didn't last long for me though as Zero/Amanda became better fleshed-out with unique traits and characteristics. As a fellow artist (writer), I found a lot of Zero's struggle to be relatable. The self-doubt and anxiety caused by the idea of sharing your art—whether it's a painting, a story, music, or something else—can be crippling. So many creative people never end up sharing their work and are locked in a permanent state of stress just by the mere thought of trying. Zero reminds us that even if you fail, you won't know for sure until you try, and fear will only keep you locked in place forever. I'd recommend Zero to YA readers, especially young artists, writers, musicians, or anyone else who one day dreams of sharing their soul with others.