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eBook Rebound ePub

eBook Rebound ePub

by Bob Krech

  • ISBN: 0761453199
  • Category: Literature and Fiction
  • Subcategory: Teens
  • Author: Bob Krech
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Skyscape; 1 edition (October 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 271
  • ePub book: 1981 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1488 kb
  • Other: lit docx txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 915

Description

Bob Krech lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. This is his first novel. The Plot of Bob Kerch's "Rebound" The plot of this story seems immediately clear during the beginning of the book.

Bob Krech lives in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. A young man's struggle to be part of a team appears to be the main focus. The main character Ray is a young, white athlete competing for a place on his high school basketball team.

Early on, REBOUND is non-stop basketball action. Bob Krech shows Ray playing constantly in an effort to make the high school team.

Prejudice can be defined in many ways as Ray finds out when he crosses the. Early on, REBOUND is non-stop basketball action. As the book progresses, another dimension begins to appear - prejudice. Racial tension begins to rear its ugly head between players, friends, coaches, and parents.

Robert E Stevens, David L Loudon, Bob Kimball - The Book on Management. Robert E Stevens, David L Loudon, Bob Kimball.

It looked like every black kid in the school was going out for the team. And then me. Pale skin, long nose, sandy brown hair, and a cowlick that won’t stay down. It looked like every black kid in the school was going out for the team.

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It looked like every black kid in the school was going out for the team. And then me. Pale skin, long nose, sandy brown hair, and a cowlick that won’t stay down. I don’t know what I expected, but it wasn’t being the only white guy.Black kids play basketball. White kids wrestle. That’s the way it is at Franklin High School and especially in Ray Wisniewski’s neighborhood, the tight knit Polish-American town of Greenville, New Jersey. But Ray’s got a passion for basketball, even after the varsity coach cuts him two years in a row. When a new coach comes on the scene, Ray’s luck rebounds, but now he has to deal with Robert, the team’s high scorer, a kid who hates Ray simply because he’s white.As Ray fights to make his way onto the Franklin High Varsity, he finds that things are not as simple as he once thought—that a kind friend can be full of hate. A beautiful girl can be ugly inside. A well-intentioned coach can cause more harm than good. And prejudice can be defined in many ways in a world that isn’t black-and-white.

Comments

Dreladred Dreladred
This is a compelling, well-written and though-provoking book about a boy caught in a triangle: One side black, another white, and the base, keeping him grounded: basketball. High-school-age Ray explores his thoughts, conscience and prejudices - as well as those of his friends, family and enemies - in bare-bones honest terms that most of us, black, white or any color, can relate to. He separates the real from the imagined, the hate from the love. Particularly intriguing are the strengths and facades of the teachers and girls who people his world (although I have to say that I was taken aback at the girls' sophistication). The story line - his failures and triumphs as a player and as a friend - is suspensefully told as counterpoint to Ray's consistent love of basketball, and his allegiance to his personal values. Great book for teens and adults.
Legend 33 Legend 33
I like the way the author weaved bigotry throughout a story about a kid that loved to play basketball. This so reminded me of how it was when I was growing up in the 50's and 60's. But the story line seems to take place in the very recent past. That confused me. I thought we had moved beyond this type of intra school bigotry. The characters seemed so real. I could relate to all of them looking back at my high school days. How the protagonist wrestles with his conscience about doing the right thing is extremely well done. We all could relate to his struggles. And, the ending will surprise you! Well done!
Mash Mash
When I first read the description of the book on amazon, I was a bit reluctant to read it. It seemed like it would be a story of a kid complaining about situations that he got himself into and never tried to fix. I decided to buy the book after reading the reviews and seeing the positive remarks that they had, and I am glad I did. This book had a complex story line with many complications in which the main character Ray had to try to bridge a gap between to groups that did not understand each other and did not want to try to. Ray also had to make difficult decisions about the people who he wanted to be around him in his life, and whether certain people who he known all his life and whom his family accepted were the right people to be around. Another great thing about this book is that most if not all of the characters were three dimensional. You could always see why a character chose to act the way they did even if what they did was hateful and wrong. Even though the story revolves around basketball and racism that most of us will thankfully never have to face to such a degree, it is still a relate-able and like able story that I would recommend to anyone who was interested in it.
Shak Shak
Assignment 3 - Review Essay
The Plot of Bob Kerch's "Rebound"
Robert P
Excelsior College

The Plot of Bob Kerch's "Rebound"
The plot of this story seems immediately clear during the beginning of the book. A young man's struggle to be part of a team appears to be the main focus. The main character Ray is a young, white athlete competing for a place on his high school basketball team. The issue is being one of a small group of white athletes in a mixed race school. This issue soon becomes more complex and involved. Ray's struggle becomes maintaining relationships with his new team members who are black, and the white friends he grew up with. Ray also deals with his need to fit in and his drive to get what he wants. The issues of friendship and racism in the inner city ultimately drive the decisions made by this character.
The subject of racial tension is prevalent and highlighted by Ray's concern at basketball tryouts. Ray's anxiety grows as he believes he is the only white student trying out for the basketball team. Already anxious about the tryout, this adds to his nervousness and appears to break his concentration. Walking into the gym with "every black kid in school," seems to intimidate Ray. He finally "felt his chest and shoulders relax" once other white players joined the tryout (Kerch, 2006, p.8). At this point in the story, Ray's true feelings about the racial tensions are unknown. Ray knew what to expect when making the decision to try out, but persisted because he loved the game.
Disappointment at not making the team the first year, and yet again the second year lead the reader to believe that Ray will give up his dream. This discouragement brings more feelings related to the racial tensions Ray feels, as he sees the same black players chosen year after year. A sense of resentment and anger take over as he "has no problem with black people...except trying to get on the basketball team"(Kerch, 2006, p.10). The disappointment is an opportunity to bond with his white friends who see no reason for Ray to pursue the basketball team. The members of this group were raised with similar morals and values during a time when such an obvious separation of races was widely accepted.
The opportunity to prove himself at an outside league with the same players who beat him on the high school team, allows Ray the opportunity to use his skill and inner motivation. The black players who were so strongly resented, have no choice but to acknowledge Ray's skill. Being part of this team opens up many doors, but because of the opportunity, other issues come up. Trying to maintain two separate existences with the old friends and the new team becomes a daily struggle for Ray.
Ray's goal becomes maintaining relationships with both groups. When one of Ray's white friends Walter arranges for a fight with a group of black basketball players, Ray finds himself torn between the two groups. This moment in the story makes Ray realize how prejudiced Walter is and the reader also sees Rays true feelings. As Ray walks away from the fight he realizes "Walter's gone."
I don't believe that Ray is necessarily happy with the outcome, but in the end he achieved his goals. Ray does not allow racism and hatred to rule his life. The realization that some people refuse to change allows Ray to deal with his friendships and be true to his own beliefs about the differences between people.

References
Kerch, Bob. (2006). Rebound. New York, NY: Marshall Cavendish.
Golden Lama Golden Lama
For the most part this was a very enjoyable story. I would have liked to see a little more depth in some of the characters. Because this deals with race it had the potential to go down the same old tired road which I am happy to report it did not.

I agree with a previous poster that to me all of this kind of stuff is settled in middle school. Still, the read was quick and light with a few errors thrown in. A good read for younger people.
Agantrius Agantrius
Rebound is an intriguing book. In other words, it is not just another book about basketball. While the book spins around the game, it really is a story about prejudice in our schools, and in "the game." The author goes deep to describe the motivations of his characters. For example, from the start, the reader sees a young man making the decision to be different from what is expected from the typical Polish guy in his neighborhood. That choice cascades into multiple choices that will be made changing the lives of the characters involved. Both guys and girls will enjoy this intricate story as it forces the reader to predict outcomes of the twists in the story.