cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Dirty Laundry: Stories About Family Secrets
eBook Dirty Laundry: Stories About Family Secrets ePub

eBook Dirty Laundry: Stories About Family Secrets ePub

by Lisa Rowe Fraustino

  • ISBN: 0670879118
  • Category: Literature and Fiction
  • Subcategory: Teens
  • Author: Lisa Rowe Fraustino
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Viking Juvenile; First Edition edition (June 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1613 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1656 kb
  • Other: doc rtf lit docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 879

Description

Dirty Laundry by Lisa Rowe Fraustino Scholastic. Although the book is approximately fifteen years old, Dirty Laundry: stories about family secrets tells eleven stories that most teens and even adults can connect to.

Dirty Laundry by Lisa Rowe Fraustino Scholastic. Scholastic, Helping Children Around the World to Read and Learn Scholastic. Forecasts: Children's books. Publishers Weekly, 245(23), 61. Name: Sarah Fretz. Each story is written by a popular author that most teens know. What is unique about each of these stories is how they each tell a story about a family with a secret.

Graham Salisbury shines with "Something Like. Love," his story about a Hawaiian boy who befriends a Caribbean man of mystery and in the process learns a little about what matters in life

Dirty Laundry by Lisa Rowe Fraustino Scholastic.

Many teenagers discover that their families have secrets see all Many teenagers discover that their families have secrets. This book contains 11 different stories in which the main characters must accept a different view of some family members after secrets are told including plagiarism, suicide attempts, stage fright, Many teenagers discover that their families have secrets.

Dirty Laundry : Stories about Family Secrets.

In 1961 Lisa was born in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine. She currently lives with her husband in Connecticut where she teaches at Eastern Connecticut State University

In 1961 Lisa was born in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine. She currently lives with her husband in Connecticut where she teaches at Eastern Connecticut State University. from Binghamton University. A professor of English at Eastern Connecticut State University, Lisa is also a visiting associate professor at the Hollins University Graduate Program in Children's Literature

The stories are engrossing; the writers stray from the obvious, making for many pleasant reading surprises. Fraustino (Ash, 1995, et. presents 11 fresh, diverse pieces in a fierce collection of salacious family stories.

The stories are engrossing; the writers stray from the obvious, making for many pleasant reading surprises. The theme is sure to appeal to a wide audience, and these stories run from merely amusing to devastating. The weakest story comes first: In Bruce Coville's attention-grabber, Randy discovers not only that he has a long, lost uncle, but also that the uncle is a pre-op transsexual.

Dirty laundry: Stories about family secrets. Lisa Rowe Fraustino, ed. Viking. The door in the lake.

The Secret of Life According to Aunt Gladys in Dirty Laundry: Stories About Family Secrets. New York: Viking, 1998. Randy discovers he has an uncle whom the family doesn’t talk about, and when George arrives for an unexpected visit, planning to stay while he becomes Gladys, Randy discovers why. Ages 10 and up. DePaola, Tomie 26 Fairmont Avenue (series), .

A collection of eleven original short stories includes contributions by such authors as Cris Crutcher, M. E. Kerr, and Bruce Coville, and explores the haunting, funny, and unexpected secrets kept by families.

Comments

Dori Dori
I wasn't overly impressed with this collection of short stories. The first story "The Secret Life, According to Aunt Gladys" by Bruce Coville started the book off in a great place (although the book sleeve ruined an early shock) especially with its haunting last line. Then the stories of Susan Campbell Bartoletti, Dian Curtis Regan, Anna Grossnickle Hines, Rita Williams-Garcia, and Richard Peck all suffered from predictability and a been-there-read-that mentality. The stories were okay, and some even better than that, but reading one after the other was just too much.
The next story, although entertaining, was too science fiction for me. Yes, "I Will Not Think of Maine" by M.E. Kerr dealt with a family secret, but you have to beleive in the supernatural to fully except the story. Currently, I'm reading for reality. I'm looking for stories that can be used to help some of the kids that I'm working for. This story is not one of them.
Then came a diamond in the rough. "FRESh PAINt" by Lisa Rowe Fraustino (the editor) was a awesome and moving story. I can't beleive that none of the other reviewers to this date (July 14, 2001) have mentioned it. This short story was one of the longest in the book (and I hate LONG SHORT stories) but I flew through it. "FRESh PAINt" has a strong mystery, a strong family secrets, and a painful moment that brought me to tears. Anyone who has read the story knows what I am talking about.
The rest of the stories also were pretty good and seem to be favorites of other reviewers. "Passport" bt Laurie Halse Anderson has a creative and sharp-tongued style that made it a joy to read. "Something Like... Love" by Graham Salisbury was a nice story, but its family secret was probably the weakest of the collection. "Popeye the Sailor" by Chris Crutcher was definitely the correct story to end the book with. Its conclusion seems to put an okay book to rest. The style of the story (it opens as a play before turning to narrative) is gripping. The story shocks you into beleiving and it ends before we know everything, but we know enough. It's a wonderful story.
Overall, the book is decent. The long stretch of predictablity to supernatural from Campbell Bartoletti's "Rice Pudding Days" to Kerr's "I Will Not Think of Maine" makes the book hard to finish, but with Rowe Fraustino and Crutcher, there is light at the end of the tunnel.
Malodora Malodora
"Dirty Laundry: Stories About Family Secrets" is a well compiled and, for the most part, well written anthology of stories. Each revolves around a long-concealed secret, and most are entertaining, though the overall tone of the book does tend to lean toward the morbid - or at least unpleasant.
The book was edited by author Lisa Rowe Frautino, who also penned its well-written but sometimes very disturbing story, "FRESh PAINt". A couple other stories of note are "The Secret of Life, According to Aunt Gladys" by Bruce Coville ("Jeremy Thatcher, Dragon Hatcher"), "I Will Not Think of Maine" by M.E. Kerr, and "Rice Pudding Days" by Susan Campbell Bartoletti.
To sum up: I personally am not a fan of unhappy stories, especially so many in one place, but this is still a high-quality book which makes for interesting and often mysterious reading. Still, I would not recommend it to anyone under 14 or so -- for a younger person looking for a short story anthology, I would recommend "13: Thirteen stories that celebrate the agony and ecstasy of being thirteen" (which incidentally also features an entertaining story by the aforementioned Coville).
Enone Enone
This book is put into lots and lots of short stories. I love many of the authors that contributed stories. Some of the stories were very good, such as:
"The Secret of Life, According to Aunt Gladys" by Bruce Coville
"Waiting for Sebastian" by Richard Peck
"Passport" by Laurie Halse Anderson
These were the ones I would have liked for them to be real books. But not an amazing book in a whole. If you're into the whole family traditions, family secrets thing, then I might recommend it. And also if you'd just read the good stories (above), then go for this book, but this one isn't a winner.
~Atalanta
wanderpool wanderpool
I read the entire anthology. "Passport" and "Something Like . . . Love" were good stories. Not great, but good. Every other story in the anthology, though, was awful. Some would have been disappointing from a middle schooler; in the cases of authors whose other stories or novels I had read, I found those in this anthology poor examples of their writing; in the cases of authors whose other work I had not read, this book was no motivation. Also: you at Amazon have listed the book's reading level as "Ages 9 to 12." Are you sure you don't mean "Grades 9 to 12"?
LivingCross LivingCross
This book is full of fictional short stories. All there short stories had the same overall topic, dirty laundry of the family's past, present, and future. This book explains how not every family is perfect, and has someing shamful to hide from the rest of the world. This was a good book, some stories more engaging than others. Overall, I think this book lacked in interesting deatail, but included creative ideas for each story. I would recamend this anyone to read this book that needs a laugh, but more encouragement to the teenage readers.
Puchock Puchock
This is a great book! Our magazine is currentlly offering it as our BOOK OF THE MONTH! I liked how the authors of each short story put their lifes into prespective! It is a very interestin book! I recommend it to everyone!
crazy mashine crazy mashine
I think that most readers would like something about this book because each story had different qualities than all of the other stories. The main theme of this book is that the sterotype of a perfect family is really a very odd family, because every family is different,and every family has problems. I think that this is a great book for any kind of reader.