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eBook The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle ePub

eBook The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle ePub

by Catherine Webb

  • ISBN: 1904233600
  • Category: Mysteries and Thrillers
  • Subcategory: Teens
  • Author: Catherine Webb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group; 2nd Edition edition (February 2, 2006)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1162 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1240 kb
  • Other: azw txt lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 598

Description

Catherine Webb's brilliant world of Horatio Lyle, special constable and inventor, is the intersection of Doctor Who .

Catherine Webb's brilliant world of Horatio Lyle, special constable and inventor, is the intersection of Doctor Who, Sherlock Holmes, and Harry Potter. Full of sly wit, adventure, and well, things that explode, The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle is quite likely to be the best book no one will hear of this year. When a culturally significant artifact, the Fuyun Plate, is stolen from the Bank of England and the theives that stole it are murdered, Constable Lyle is called in to solve the mystery.

Start by marking The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio . Horatio Lyle is Overall, I liked reading this book. It has some small faults, though.

Start by marking The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle (Horatio Lyle, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He's also an occasional, but reluctant, sleuth. The story itself is good, it's nice to read and quite exciting towards the end.

Timekeepers; The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle; A Madness of Angels. Catherine Webb at Little, Brown Book Group. Catherine Webb at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Catherine Webb (born 1986) is a British author, educated at the Godolphin and Latymer School, London, and the London School of Economics. Catherine Webb also writes fantasy novels for adults under the name Kate Griffin Contents. Interview with "Kate Griffin". Kate Griffin's official Web site and blog.

The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle is the first book in the Horatio Lyle series by British author, Catherine Webb. The scene is London, 1864. Horatio Lyle, son of Harry and Milly Lyle, is an enthusiastic inventor and occasional sleuth. Shortly after he catches young pick-pocket and thief, Teresa Hatch leaving the scene of her latest break-in (his house), he is called to the Palace by Lord Lincoln to temporarily resume his position as Special Constable.

Электронная книга "The Extraordinary & Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle: Number 1 in series", Catherine Webb. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Extraordinary & Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle: Number 1 in series" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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He’s also an occasional, but reluctant, sleuth. The truth is that he’d rather be in his lab tinkering with dangerous chemicals and odd machinery than running around the cobbled streets of London trying to track down stolen goods. But when Her Majesty’s Government calls, Horatio swaps his microscope for a magnifying glass, fills his pockets with things that explode and sallies forth to unravel a mystery of a singularly extraordinary nature.

LoveReading View on The Extraordinary And Unusual Adventures Of Horatio .

LoveReading View on The Extraordinary And Unusual Adventures Of Horatio Lyle. Witty, action-packed and perfect for fans of detective stories, fantasy stories and good old-fashioned adventure. Catherine Webb was born 1986 and is a British author, educated at the Godolphin and Latymer School, London, and the London School of Economics. She was just fourteen years old when she completed Mirror Dreams, written during her school summer holidays. She sent her book of to a publisher who thoroughly enjoyed reading it. The book was published in 2002, and Webb was soon named Young Trailblazer of the Year by the magazine Cosmo GirlUK.

Based (heavily) on Catherine Webb's The Extraordinary and unusual adventures of Horatio Lyle. Get notified when The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Matthew Patrick is updated.

Horatio Lyle is a former Special Constable and an occasional, but reluctant, sleuth. Thrown together with a reformed pickpocket called Tess, and a rebellious gentleman called Thomas, Lyle and his hound, Tate, find themselves pursuing an ancient Chinese plate, a conspiracy that reaches to the highest levels of polite society.

Comments

Xarcondre Xarcondre
I'm always suspicious when introductions mention the age of the author. Sigh. This is indeed written by and for a (young) teenager. I couldn't make it more than 3 chapters in so take my review with a grain of salt. As another reviewer suggested, try Pullman or Newt's Emerald by Garth Nix if you want something in this genre that doesn't seem like a series of trite cliches.
Tejar Tejar
The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle is the first book in the Horatio Lyle series by British author, Catherine Webb. The scene is London, 1864. Horatio Lyle, son of Harry and Milly Lyle, is an enthusiastic inventor and occasional sleuth. Shortly after he catches young pick-pocket and thief, Teresa Hatch leaving the scene of her latest break-in (his house), he is called to the Palace by Lord Lincoln to temporarily resume his position as Special Constable. He is needed to investigate the theft from the Bank of England of, among other valuables, the Fuyun Plate, a Tibetan artefact made by a powerful race of angel-demons. He decides to take Tess along with him, as well as, of course, his faithful and very useful hound, Tate. At the Bank they encounter Master Thomas Edward Elwick, heir to the Third Baron of Elwick; Thomas is keen to be useful in the investigation, and this team of four soon find themselves involved in all sorts of escapades as they try to solve the robbery and find the Fuyun Plate before it falls into the wrong hands. While the details of the character backgrounds are sparse, their dialogue, their resourcefulness and their sense of adventure will certainly appeal to young readers, as will the myriad of inventions (dynamos, flash bombs, tasers, chemical explosives) and the non-stop action (abseiling down buildings, zip-lining, roof-top chases, sliding down bannisters, fights with evil beings wielding crossbows). Webb has fun with character names (Tate and Lyle, Inspector Vellum, Miss Mercy Chaste, the vicar’s daughter, Mr Dew) in this fight between inventive, scientific Londoners and a decidedly malevolent army of a quite different sort of greenie. Young fans will look forward to the second book in the series, The Obsidian Dagger. A fun read.
unmasked unmasked
The Obsidian Dagger is the second book in the Horatio Lyle series by British author, Catherine Webb. As Horatio, Thomas, Tess and Tate work on their pressure-differential-velocity aeronautic device, their research is interrupted by Lord Lincoln, who insists that Her Majesty once again requires Lyle’s input into an important case. A ship’s captain and one of Lincoln’s agents have been murdered on board ship. As always, Lyle is given little to go on, but he certainly garners more information from the scene and the witness than does Inspector Vellum. Lyle finds himself on the trail of a priest and the contents of a stone sarcophagus, but soon, similar murders occur. It seems the very stones of London are coming to life and nowhere is safe. Webb fills her tale with wonderful inventions and fantastic happenings: underwater breathing apparatus, underwater lights, earth tremors, jumps from buildings, flights over the city, a frozen Thames, a great battle, a stone dagger and even a cameo from a youthful Arthur Conan Doyle. Webb expands her main characters a little and brings back one of the characters from the first book for a major role. Nursery rhymes are a connecting theme throughout. This is another enjoyable read and young fans will eagerly await the third book in the series, The Doomsday Machine.
Steep Steep
The Obsidian Dagger is the sequel to The Extraordinary and Unusual Adventures of Horatio Lyle (which the Booklist description above mistakenly refers to). It stands on its own, but starting with the first book in what is now a series of four would fill out the characters' backgrounds. I've been a fan of Catherine Webb since picking up Waywalkers, and I think the Horatio Lyle series is her best work yet.

It's London, 1864. Horatio Lyle, a Special Constable who's very determinedly convinced that science is the key to everything, is summoned by Lord Lincoln, aide to Queen Victoria, to investigate two murders at the docks. Lyle reluctantly agrees and with his young assistants Tess (pickpocket and housebreaker) and Thomas (a lord's son with a dream of powered flight), plus his dog Tate, quickly finds himself deep in a terrifying adventure. His adversary has plans for London, and with both friends and enemies lurking in the shadows and the city itself coming to life, Lyle might just be forced to admit that science can't explain everything - though it might help save the day, along with a certain obsidian dagger ...

This is a great read, with engaging characters, humour, exciting action sequences, great atmosphere and a satisfying conclusion. Even the science in this series is pretty well right (or so I'm told by someone who knows much more than I do). There is the occasional anachronism and there's no pretence that the language is purely period-accurate, but for the most part that doesn't bother me when when balanced against this book's good qualities.

It's the writing that really sets the Horatio Lyle series apart, and that's not something you can say for most books aimed at younger readers. Webb has a distinctive style, heavy on imagery, run-on sentences, repetition and recurring motifs, and while it won't please everyone - and indeed, might prove too challenging for some children - it's what creates the atmosphere and drama in The Obsidian Dagger, and draws together the themes of the book.

There are some faults. Webb's word choice is at times questionable, leading to a lack of clarity. She can wear her influences too heavily (think Terry Pratchett's Discworld inhabited by a Doctor Who, probably the Fifth), and a desire to choose the clever, as opposed to the right, word or image sometimes derails the momentum of her prose.

But those factors do little to diminish Webb's achievement or dim my enjoyment of her books, and I always have fun visiting the teeming metropolis of London to spend time with rational and reluctantly heroic Lyle, cheeky and decisive Tess and Thomas, who's always so determined to do the right thing. I'm also very glad to have a series that is unashamedly positive about humans, science and their impact on the world. The Obsidian Dagger is so very visual, I'd love to see it turned into a film or TV series. It's also a beautifully produced book (at least for my edition), with high-quality paper, a sequence of charming little drawings across the beginning of each chapter, good fonts and an excellent cover with line drawings rather than photos or cheap CGI.

I'd guess that The Obsidian Dagger, like the rest of the series, is suitable for ages 12 and up, based on the language level. There's no sex or swearing, the murders happen offscreen and while there is some violence on screen, it has consequences and there are no gory details.