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eBook The Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago Travellers) ePub

eBook The Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago Travellers) ePub

by ISABELLE EBERHARDT

  • ISBN: 0860687694
  • Category: Africa
  • Subcategory: Travels
  • Author: ISABELLE EBERHARDT
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: VIRAGO PRESS LTD (1987)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1754 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1550 kb
  • Other: rtf docx mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 137

Description

The Nomad: The Diaries of Isabelle Eberhardt. Kabban claims to have been inspired by Cecily Mackworth's biography of Eberhardt, The Destiny of Isabelle Eberhardt, and I suppose I will have to investigate that book. One person found this helpful.

The Nomad: The Diaries of Isabelle Eberhardt.

An image of Isabelle Eberhardt ensconced in orientalist framing. Isabelle Eberhardt's grave at Ain-Sefra. Isabelle is the quintessential traveler. She hungers for new experiences and needs action in her life. She carried several of her books with her, including those of Pierre Loti and Dostoevsky. She feels uncomfortable in civilized places and feels most at home in Algeria, among the native people living a simple life.

Isabelle Wilhelmine Marie Eberhardt (17 February 1877 – 21 October 1904) was a Swiss explorer and author. As a teenager, Eberhardt, educated in Switzerland by her father, published short stories under a male pseudonym. She became interested in North. She became interested in North Africa, and was considered a proficient writer on the subject despite learning about the region only through correspondence. After an invitation from photographer Louis David, Eberhardt moved to Algeria in May 1897

Book Description VIRAGO PRESS LTD, 1987. Eberhardt, the 19th century traveller so vividly evoked in Lesley Blanch's The Wilder Shores of Love, here speaks through her own journals and diaries.

Book Description VIRAGO PRESS LTD, 1987. Condition: VERY GOOD. Light rubbing wear to cover, spine and page edges. Born into a middle-class Swiss family, she moved to Algeria in her early 20s and spent her remaining few years (she died in a flash flood at the age of 28) wandering through North Africa disguised as Si Mahmoud, a male itinerant Sufi.

Tan to the page edges. Authors : Eberhardt, Isabelle. List Price (MSRP) : . 9. item 1 Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago travellers), Eberha -Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago travellers), Eberha. item 2 The Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago travellers) By -The Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago travellers) By. £. 4.

Find nearly any book by Isabelle Eberhardt. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Sandmeere 1. Tagwerke.

The Passionate Nomad : The Diary of Isabelle Eberhardt. by Isabelle Eberhardt.

Фильм про бывшего офицера спецназа - Лесной и городская, Русские детективы новинки 2019 - Продолжительность: 1:28:57 СыщикТВ Recommended for you.

Isabelle: Life of Isabelle Eberhardt, Kobak, Annette, Good Condition Book, ISBN. Passionate Nomad: The Journals of Isabelle Eberhardt (Virago travellers), Eberha. In the Shadow of Islam by Isabelle Eberhardt. The Nomad: The Diaries of Isabelle Eberhardt, Paperback, by Elizabeth Kershaw.

Comments

Mayno Mayno
Great writer. Great diary. Book in excellent condition.
Humin Humin
This is the first book about Isabelle Eberhardt I ever read, but had read two books of tales she wrote. She was a poet, a true nomad, and a gifted storyteller who lived her short but colorful life her way. So when I found this slender book, recognizing her name, and read the introduction by its editor Rana Kabbani in 1984, I was shocked that anyone would introduce the Diary by slamming someone who died in a flashflood at age 28, 113 years ago. Why did she bother to edit the Diary, anyway? Kabbani compared poor Isabelle to people (Kabbani) despised and in the case of T. E. Lawrence, mercilessly slandered. On page vi of the Introduction, Kabbani writes:

"Like Flaubert, who [...] engaged Cairene prostitutes; like Andre Gide or T. E. Lawrence, who only managed to come out of their respective closets when they solicited the services of Arab boys; or like those endless droves of Western hippies who landed in India in the sixties and seventies, a paperback copy of The Karma Sutra in hand to [...] 'let it all hang out' (much to the embarrassment and hilarity of the local people)..."

Kabbani introduces Eberhardt's North African voyage as "a sexual trip in the contemporary sense of the word." Kabbani (gender unknown to me) tears Eberhardt's character to pieces as an introduction to the girl's diary, which, while in some ways true, (she was rather a vagabond, did dress as a young male yet loved men, and did often accept, at first, the traditional hospitality of the region; did smoke kif, but so did most of the population, and, by the way, so did the renowned author-expatriate to Morocco, Paul Bowles, among others). But Eberhardt fell in love with, converted to Islam for, and married a young man named Slimene, and her utmost to adhere to Muslim law, often taking a a mystical step forward and two backward, as most of us do on our lives' journeys. Her entries about horses and the Sahara were heart-pulling and lyrical. She was young and impetuous and loved freedom.

That Kabbani despised Eberhardt yet edited her Diary is, to say the least, puzzling. It causes a discerning reader who is familiar with Eberhardt's writings suspect the editor's editing! Kabbani who had utter contempt for Eberhardt may have possibly cut very important passages from the Diary of a defenseless dead girl to support the opinions in the Introduction. I believe this because Kabbani writes, on page xi of the Introduction: "In editing these diaries, I have found it best to delete such passages as seemed unjustifiably repetitious, as well as most of the poems or the bits of prose that Isabelle copied out from books."

Kabbani assumes that although Isabelle's death was accidental (she was caught in a flashflood) that it "somehow takes on the poignancy of a suicide. One can just picture her lying there lying under the fatal timbers, [...] weighted down by full clothes like a travesty of Ophelia [...]" I do not believe that to be correct, and it is a malicious comment. She loved life and was no Ophelia, "the 'hoar leaves' of the tattered notebooks of her diary swollen by water as their entries had been swollen by tears." I can imagine Kabbani sneering as she wrote that passage. One who is editing something like a biography of Stalin might be excused for, even expected to, disparage such an infamous person, but not someone like Isabelle Eberhardt, who meant no harm to anyone.

As I re-read this Diary, I found, as I did the first time reading it when this was published, that Isabelle Eberhardt gave far more than she got in life, and died tragically. She was an exquisitely sweet poet and a storyteller whom Isak Dinesen might have found intriguing and would have admired. She loved life especially because she narrowly escaped death once. I believe she was courageous and she certainly merited a more worthy appraiser than a severely opinionated editor to introduce her Diarywith such contempt for the author that she commits character assassination and as suggested above, was probably very careful to select freely from its contents, thereby depriving the reader of the complete diary that may have been relevant and important and showed even more of her passionate character.

Kabban claims to have been inspired by Cecily Mackworth's biography of Eberhardt, The Destiny of Isabelle Eberhardt, and I suppose I will have to investigate that book.
THOMAS THOMAS
ho hum