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eBook Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria ePub

eBook Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria ePub

by Noo Saro-Wiwa

  • ISBN: 1847083315
  • Category: Africa
  • Subcategory: Travels
  • Author: Noo Saro-Wiwa
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Granta Books; 1st Edition edition (2013)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1325 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1157 kb
  • Other: lrf docx rtf txt
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 443

Description

Saro-Wiwa is a sharp and insightful guide, giving readers an intimate look at the varied regions that comprise this .

Saro-Wiwa is a sharp and insightful guide, giving readers an intimate look at the varied regions that comprise this fascinating country. The author allows her love-hate relationship with Nigeria to flavor this thoughtful travel journal, lending it irony, wit and frankness. In doing so, she is faced with a variety of every day problems with which the vast majority of Nigerians have to cope with.

Noo (pronounced Gnaw) Saro-Wiwa is an adventurous soul Saro-Wiwa's journey begins at Gatwick, with a cancelled flight and the usual mayhem associated with Nigerians abroad.

Noo (pronounced Gnaw) Saro-Wiwa is an adventurous soul. She spent most of the four months she was in Nigeria for this book either travelling in the fabled "flying coffins", the craft of African airlines, or holed up in one or other of the country's notoriously shabby hotels, usually without electricity or running water. Saro-Wiwa's journey begins at Gatwick, with a cancelled flight and the usual mayhem associated with Nigerians abroad. She is suitably embarrassed as she watches "our national image sink further in the eyes of the world" for which she blames decades of corruption that "have made us deeply suspicious of authority".

Noo Saro-Wiwa's sharply observed Nigerian travelogue reveals another side to the African giant, says Ian Birrell

Noo Saro-Wiwa's sharply observed Nigerian travelogue reveals another side to the African giant, says Ian Birrell. Looking for Transwonderland is unlikely to persuade many people to brave the infamous scrums at Lagos airport, filled as it is with anecdotes of hotel chefs who refuse to cook, terrifying traffic ordeals and casual indifference to cultural heirlooms.

Now she has gone back and written a book about i. Ms Saro-Wiwa recently visited BBC Africa's studios in London and told our presenter Bola Mosuro what made her change her mind and what she discovered during her trip. For more African news from the BBC download the Africa Today podcast.

Looking for Transwonderland book. The book succeeds in conveying just how diverse Nigeria is in every sense

Looking for Transwonderland book. The book succeeds in conveying just how diverse Nigeria is in every sense. Saro-Wiwa, born in Nigeria but mainly raised and resident in the UK, is constantly identified as a foreigner, but this seems extraordinarily perceptive of those she meets, considering the plethora of ethnic and linguistic identities cohabiting the clearly artificially bounded state. Even more striking to me is the contrast between the characters of the various cities she visits and attendant disparities in lifestyle.

Noo Saro-Wiwa’s double advantage is to understand personally the mindset of Nigerians as a distinct ethnicity while reporting back to us as an acculturated Westerner, our far-flung correspondent. As the daughter of Ken Saro-Wiwa, the Nigerian environmental activist who was murdered in 1995, she was educated in England and taken back, against her will, to Nigeria every summer by her parents to remind her of her roots

Noo Saro-Wiwa was brought up in England but spent her childhood . A mediocre travel book. Saro-Wiwa is too often unwilling to engage with other people along the way.

Noo Saro-Wiwa was brought up in England but spent her childhood summers in Nigeria - a country she considered an unglamorous parallel universe, devoid of all creature comforts. After her father, activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, was murdered there in 1995, Noo rarely returned to the land of her birth. Looking for Transwonderland is the first major non-fiction narrative of modern Nigeria; an engaging portrait of a country whose beauty and variety few of us will experience, depicted with wit and insight by a refreshing new voice in contemporary travel writing.

NOO SARO-WIWA was born in Nigeria in 1976 and raised in England. She attended King's College London and Columbia University in New York and has written travel guides for Rough Guide and Lonely Planet. She currently lives in London. Country of Publication. The World, Ideas, Culture": General Interest.

Saro-Wiwa travels from the exuberant chaos of Lagos to the calm beauty of the eastern mountains; from the eccentricity of a Nigerian dog show to the decrepit kitsch of the Transwonderland Amusement Park. She explores Nigerian Christianity, delves into the country’s history of slavery, examines the corrupting effect of oil, and ponders the huge success of Nollywood.

Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria

Comments

Vut Vut
A very honest account by the Nigerian author Noo Saro-Wiwa, living in London, who travels around very different parts of her native country. In doing so, she is faced with a variety of every day problems with which the vast majority of Nigerians have to cope with. But no matter how difficult the life in Nigeria is, the author still finds love for many things about Nigeria: "the dances, the masks, the music, the baobab trees and the drill monkeys".
Fomand Fomand
Noo Sara-Wiwa's travelogue around Nigeria is a very personal one. She grew up in the UK and had not visited the country as an adult. She also acknowledges her love-hate relationship with the country given the execution of her father by the then military regime.
I enjoyed the book a great deal since I lived in Nigeria for some years and also traveled around the country quite a bit. I enjoyed her observations on everyday life and the Nigerian psyche. I also appreciated learning about some of the rather obscure places she visited along the way.
I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in Nigeria, lives there, lived there, loves the place and has hopes for its redemption!
Goll Goll
The author's lifelong uneasy relationship with her birth country animates this book. Saro-Wiwa has a lively voice and is happy to make fun of herself along the road. Having just lived for three years in Nigeria, I recognized not just the places and the people, but the crazy optimistic spirit of the country. Saro-Wiwa does not sidestep the tough issues entirely, but I do think that since her visit, the political and social tensions in Nigeria have increased markedly. As a result, readers very familiar with the country may find the picture a bit sweeter than current realities.
Ferri - My name Ferri - My name
I enjoyed reading this book because, while (as expected) it tells about the various parts of Nigeria, it does it from the viewpoint of a writer who is from a Nigerian family and spent time there annually as a child. Her encounters are certainly the real Nigeria, and the details of the culture, the people, the history that she gives are intriguing. What impression will her re-acquaintance with her "home" country leave her with? Well-written.
Kagaramar Kagaramar
A great read that honestly describes the various cities and cultures in Nigeria
Thiama Thiama
This humorous and very well written book throws new light on life in Nigeria. Noo, could you please provide the address of your aunt in Lagos and ask her to open a guest house (with or without electricity or running water). I will be her first customer.
anonymous anonymous
Noo Saro-Wiwa has a keen and observant eye and the book is very fun, engaging, and readable, A funny, personal look at the Nigerian national character.
Loved the book! So interesting. Cool to hear about someone's trip to modern Nigeria and her thoughts on how Nigeria can develop.