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eBook Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan (Ideologies of Desire) ePub

eBook Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan (Ideologies of Desire) ePub

by John Whittier Treat

  • ISBN: 0195109236
  • Category: Asia
  • Subcategory: Travels
  • Author: John Whittier Treat
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (March 25, 1999)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1871 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1748 kb
  • Other: lit docx azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 631

Description

In 1986, John Whittier Treat went to Tokyo on sabbatical to write a book about the literature of Hiroshima and .

In 1986, John Whittier Treat went to Tokyo on sabbatical to write a book about the literature of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Homosexuality, Orientalism and Japan'. Author: John Whittier Treat. Homosexuality, Orientalism and Japan. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. Ideologies of Desire series. Great Mirrors Shattered. Great Mirrors Shattered : Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan. by John Whittier Treat.

Great Mirrors Shattered book. Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan (Ideologies of Desire). In 1986, John Whittier Treat went to Tokyo on sabbatical to write a book about the literature of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But once there, he found himself immersed in the emergence of new kind of Holocaust, AIDS, and the sweeping denial, hysteria, and projection with which Japan-a place where "there are no homosexuals"-tried to insulate itself from the epidemic. 0195109236 (ISBN13: 9780195109238).

Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan. Paul Gordon Schalow, John Whittier Treat. Published: 1 January 2001. in Monumenta Nipponica. Monumenta Nipponica, Volume 56; doi:10. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox. Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, and Japan.

by John Whittier Treat. Series: Ideologies of Desire (1999)

by John Whittier Treat. Series: Ideologies of Desire (1999). It is also a highly self-aware analysis of Orientalism, which the author definesas "the Western study of everywhere else," and an exploration of how sexual identity conditions knowledge across cultures.

Treat, John Whittier. Week Ten 11/5: Imaginaries of Transracial Desire -Treat, John Whittier. Intimate Ideologies: Transnational Theory and Japans Yellow Cabs. Public Culture 6:465-478

Treat, John Whittier. Great Mirrors Shattered: Homosexuality, Orientalism, Japan. New York: Oxford University Press. Public Culture 6:465-478. Nagel, Chapter 8, ASex and [email protected] pp. 224-54.

Posts about John Whittier Treat.

In 1986, John Whittier Treat went to Tokyo on sabbatical to write a book about the literature of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. But once there, he found himself immersed in the emergence of new kind of Holocaust, AIDS, and the sweeping denial, hysteria, and projection with which Japan--a place where "there are no homosexuals"--tried to insulate itself from the epidemic. Great Mirrors Shattered is a compelling memoir of a gay man thoroughly familiar with the Japanese homosexual underground, a man anxious for his own health and unsure of the relationship he has left behind in the US. It is also a highly self-aware analysis of Orientalism, which the author defines as "the Western study of everywhere else," and an exploration of how sexual identity conditions knowledge across cultures. Jump-cutting between such texts as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice, Pierre Loti's Madame Chrysantheme, Saikaku's The Great Mirror of Male Love, the writings of Roland Barthes, newspaper headlines, and his own experiences during a previous stay in Japan, Treat creates an intricately textured account of the problems inherent in how we "know" another culture. The questions of self and other, difference and sameness, time past and time present, America and Japan, are explored here with rare intelligence and unabashedly personal disclosure. Great Mirrors Shattered gives us a brilliantly fractured reflection of a year in one man's life, and the first study of the sexual politics behind what the West has come to know not just about Japan, but any place Europeans and Americans have gone to escape the confining rules of their home cultures.

Comments

Monn Monn
Such an honest, interesting read. Weaves together his own private life with observations about Japan and the US and some literary references. I came to Japan a few years after the author but so much of what he wrote resonated with me.
inform inform
Reading this book brought me back to Japan. So much of what the author indicates resonated with my experience that I found myself nodding in agreement with many of his observations. Is it accessible, therefore, for others outside of this circle of experience? I believe so. The author's writing style is so open and it brings the reader in with its power. I think the reader will learn and experience on many levels: intellectually, spiritually, physically.
Gribandis Gribandis
...which is probably what's tripping most people up. The title is misleading; when I found this book I was expecting a scholarly analysis of homosexuality as it is viewed and practiced in Japan. Instead, it turned out to be about a year the author spent in Japan after fleeing America to escape the spread of AIDS, only to watch the epidemic unfold in Japan as well--a year in the life of an introspective, promiscuous, slightly amoral intellectual.

He draws from many different sources, sometimes juxtaposed in a manner that's difficult to follow, and touches on a variety of different topics that some way or another intersect with his conception of Japan, AIDS, and being gay. This is not an academic work, this is a personal essay stretched large, a chronicle set in the 1980s gay scene. He doesn't shy away from describing the uncomfortable aspects of that life any more than he flinches from discussing the equally uncomfortable racist, neocolonialist attitudes held by various generations of white conquerors, including his own. He deconstructs these views, analyzes the causes and logic behind them, but it is clear that he does not endorse them, no more than he would endorse the quotes that are hostile or offensive to homosexuals.

Racism and colonialism are inherited, and even if we as individuals choose to reject them, they are still inherent and pervasive in our culture. Where did these ideas originate, and why? Treat ponders such questions at length, and unfortunately that sets him up for attack from people who would rather disregard uncomfortable topics than discuss them.

This is not an anthropological book, or even an ethnography. It feels almost like fiction, which makes it an engaging as well as insightful read, but it is one man's experiences and not to be confused with any sort of authoritative treatise on homosexuality in Japan.
Zugar Zugar
Reading everyone's comments of this book, I realize how controversial this piece must be and is in reality. That NO ONE rates this book anything but a 1 or a 5 speaks to its strong nature. You either love it, find meaning in it; or are repulsed by it. Speaking as a white American lesbian who has been studying queer culture in Japan and has also visited Japan, I am completed horrified by the certainity with which Treat dabbles in topics of enormous proportion. Why write a memoir if you are supposedly addressing so many key issues of social concern unless you are actually going to address them?! Besides that fact, he never once seems to apologize or doubt his masculinist and racist grip on his material. He is always a spectator, always the man behind the controls. It is sickening really. I have only read half of this book, but as I read, I read to see how much more I can become baffled at his arrogance of subject matter. His treatment of each subject, at best, leaves me cold and wondering why he even bothers to make it seem like he cares. It seems like a completely narcissistic attempt to get through some clearly lingering white suburban American guilt. I don't think the fact that queers in America have become involved with Asian Studies because is it an Orientalist gaze get's to be made into a "duh" statement or be left unquestioned. It is NOT ok, and DOES need to be discussed, not just left for stereotyping or pigeon-holing. The only part of this book that I can remotely enjoy is references to a country that I miss and experiences that may seem similar, but do not somehow excuse themselves as "boys will be boys" or some crap like that. Very disapppointing perspective, yet almost predictable from a white gay male with so much arrogance.
VizoRRR VizoRRR
I really found this book to be a lot more provocative than I expected. Treat does a really effective job of presenting the attitudes towrds homosexuality and AIDS that he experienced while living in Japan at various times in recent decades. His "shapshot" style of presenting a scene from his life followed by a quotation from someone else followed by his discussion of someone else's ideas followed by another scene from his life did get confusing at times. But, overall, his ideas were interesting and really got me thinking about AIDS and homosexuality in a culture that I don't know too much about. I'll be going back to this book, I'm sure.