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eBook Baghdad without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia ePub

eBook Baghdad without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia ePub

by Tony Horwitz

  • ISBN: 0525249605
  • Category: Middle East
  • Subcategory: Travels
  • Author: Tony Horwitz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dutton; 1st edition (March 1, 1991)
  • Pages: 276
  • ePub book: 1200 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1115 kb
  • Other: lit docx azw doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 590

Description

Tony Horwitz is the author of One for the Road and the bestselling Baghdad Without a Map. A senior writer for The Wall Street Journal and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting, he has also written for The New Yorker and Harper's, among other publications

Tony Horwitz is the author of One for the Road and the bestselling Baghdad Without a Map. A senior writer for The Wall Street Journal and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting, he has also written for The New Yorker and Harper's, among other publications. He lives with his wife and son in Virginia.

In short, Baghdad Without A Map is an In 1991, then aspiring journalist Tony Horwitz traveled to the Middle East, following his journalist wife, Geraldine Brooks, who had been stationed in Cairo there as a foreign correspond

In short, Baghdad Without A Map is an In 1991, then aspiring journalist Tony Horwitz traveled to the Middle East, following his journalist wife, Geraldine Brooks, who had been stationed in Cairo there as a foreign correspond. Horwitz decided to go freelance, traveling across Arabia in the hopes of breaking a story that would make him a household name. He did manage to get a few front page articles, but what he brought back in manuscript form was delightful, sadistic, full of beauty and pain

Tony Horwitz is a native of Washington, . and a graduate of Brown University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Tony Horwitz is a native of Washington, . He worked for many years as a reporter, first in Indiana and then during a decade overseas in Australia, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, mostly covering wars and conflicts as a foreign correspondent for "The" "Wall Street Journal". After returning to the States, he won the Pulitzer Prize for national reporting and worked as a staff writer for "The" "New Yorker" before becoming a full-time author

This is the second Tony Horwitz book I've read, after Confederates in the Attic, which was so great that I was worried I'd be disappointed if this one didn't live up to that high standard. I needn't have worried! Horwitz travels through the Middle East and he treats the people he meets with the same dignity, respect, and occasional humor that he treats Southerners with in Confederates.

Tony Horwitz, Baghdad Without a MapTony Horwitz has a pretty good shtick going; he follows his journalist wife (Geraldine Brooks) from assignment to assignment, across the globe, and then wangles freelance assignments in the new locale.

Tony Horwitz, Baghdad Without a MapTony Horwitz has a pretty good shtick going; he follows his journalist wife (Geraldine Brooks) from assignment to assignment, across the globe, and then wangles freelance assignments in the new locale

Tony Horwitz was a native of Washington, . A timely and incisive insider’s description of the mysterious Arab Worl. ony Horwitz is an ideal guide for American Reader.

Tony Horwitz was a native of Washington, . and a graduate of Brown University and Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. As a newspaper reporter he spent a decade overseas, mainly covering wars and conflict in the Middle East, Africa. ore about Tony Horwitz. Looking for More Great Reads?

When prize-winning war correspondent Tony Horwitz leaves the battlefields of Bosnia and the Middle East for a peaceful .

When prize-winning war correspondent Tony Horwitz leaves the battlefields of Bosnia and the Middle East for a peaceful corner of the Blue Ridge Mountains, he thinks he's put war zones behind him. But awakened one morning by the crackle of musket fire, Horwitz starts filing front-line dispatches again this time from a war close to home, and to his own heart. a martyr and hero; and in the book's climax, Horwitz takes a marathon trek from Antietam to Gettysburg to Appomattox in the company of Robert Lee Hodge, an eccentric pilgrim who dubs their odyssey the 'Civil Wargasm.

Why without a map? Because Saddam Hussein has banned them from his Orwellian police state, one of the dozen or. .

Why without a map? Because Saddam Hussein has banned them from his Orwellian police state, one of the dozen or so Middle Eastern countries that Horwitz explores in this witty, on-target travel book. Thumbs up, too, for Egypt, despite its mad, churning streets, polluted air, and bribe-based economy.

Baghdad without a map. And other misadventures in arabia. This wild and comic tale of Middle East misadventure is a very funny and insightful look at the world’s most combustible region. Fearlessness is a valuable quality in a travel writer, and Mr. Horwitz seems as intrepid as they come. This wild and comic tale of Middle East misadventure is "a very funny and insightful look at the world's most combustible region. Horwitz seems as intrepid as they come

The author recounts his experiences traveling through the Middle East, describing Beirut's shell-shocked streets, the Ayatollah Khomeini's grief-crazed funeral, and an unexpected encounter with Muammar Qadaffi

Comments

Narim Narim
Tony Horwitz has created a miasma that can only be compared to an Abbot and Costello movie from the 1940s. There's dancing girls, strange snakes in bags, sand homes reaching into the sky and furtive spies watching everyone as they run here and there with long swords threatening poor Lou Costello.

And, as the two Americans try to hide, try to find something good to eat and lose their passports once again, over steaming sand is the photo of Allah or is it Saddam Hussein, urging on his hatchet men who drive crazy cabs, crazy airplanes and beat-up tanks in their quest to prove their manhood and their love of God.

But, back to reality, it's only the young thirtyish Tony who's our guide through the Middle East. We're by his side for hours as he tries to get away from Khartoum or Baghdad or Tehran. Poor Tony is trying to get a good news story but all he can find is propaganda and really, really bad bootleg gin.

If you thought you'd like to visit the Casbah after watching one of those old Bud Abbot movies, well forget it. Those sabers seemed funny in celluloid, but up close and personal they can ream you out pretty good. Tony Horwitz escaped many times from scrapes with death, and we wonder why he kept going back for more. We certainly don't want to visit the desert ever again. But we might just watch another black and white movie from the vault of A & C classics. HELP!
Wooden Purple Romeo Wooden Purple Romeo
BAGHDAD WITHOUT A MAP is a series of articles Tony Horwitz wrote while trying to spark a freelance journalism career in the Middle East. The title is somewhat misleading as the articles cover a wide spectrum of Middle Eastern countries.

Horwitz does not always have an assignment as was the case when he visited Yemen, one of the most unusual countries in the book. Almost everyone in Yemen is high on Qat, a hallucinogenic shrub that the inhabitants chew like tobacco. Horwitz, who's always game for anything, samples the shrub, losing the feeling in his arms and legs when he does.

One of the most enlightening episodes was when Horwitz got an assignment to cover the tanker war on the "Strait of Hoummos." Horwitz hitches a ride on a sixty-foot Bombay boat. On board, Horwitz met the ship's engineer, a man named Jesudasyn "with the unflinching bluntness of a four-year-old." Jesudasyn wanted to know if it was true that men and women lived in America without getting married, and, if so, how could the women still be virgins when they married. In India the woman must be a virgin. They go on to discuss reincarnation and the use of condoms. This conversation goes on for all of two pages, but with culture meeting culture, there was enough material for a book of its own.

Cairo, Egypt, was almost a home base for Horwitz and his wife, noted author Geraldine Brooks. There's a concept called "Malesh" in Egypt, loosely translated to mean "whatever." Even new building in Cairo begin to fall apart almost immediately as there isn't much maintenance. There are constant blackouts and the elevators don't work in the apartment buildings. The idea that you couldn't do anything about these inconveniences anyway was prevalent in Egyptian society. After awhile even Horwitz began to experience "Malesh."

Most of the places Horwitz visited, such as The Sudan and Libya, were pretty desolate places, but then there was the Arab Emirates, one of the richest places on earth where the natives have free health care, free education, and an assurance of a job, if they want one. Guest workers outnumber natives five to one. Dubai's port was "duty free, regulation free, everything free." Compared to The Sudan, Dubai would be Heaven, The Sudan hell.

Tony Horwitz won the Pulitzer for his travelogue style writing. Other writers might emulate his ability to communicate with the native peoples, despite his inability to speak the language in some cases.
Nalmezar Nalmezar
Pulitzer Prize-winner Tony Horwitz is one of my favorite nonfiction writers, so Im not sure what took me so long to read Baghdad Without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia. My mistaken impression was that Baghdad Without a Map was about the Persian Gulf War. Actually, it's a delightful travelog of his journeys through the Middle East. Many of the stories are amusing, others are sad and some are downright disturbing. But always, Horwitz is interesting and entertaining.

Horwitz's wife, Geraldine Brooks, became a foreign correspondent stationed in Cairo, and Horwitz (an unemployed writer) decided to join her and write freelance stories as he traveled through 15 countries and emirates throughout the Middle East. The author likes to look for the offbeat, and he went to camel races in the UAE, ate qat in Yemen, watched belly dancers in Cairo who weren't allowed to show their bellies, and tried to get around Baghdad without a map (Hussein's paranoia kept maps and weather reports from being published). He also touched on more serious topics as he dodged mines in the Persian Gulf, traveled to the Ayatollah's funeral in Iran, navigated the Jordan River between Israel and Jordan, priced weapons in Yemen and witnessed horrible conditions in the Sudan. But what Horwitz does best is talk to people, and he found a surprising number of Arabs who were willing to share their stories (not necessarily an easy job for a Jewish writer). This is how Horwitz was able to discover the true complexities of the Middle East. For instance,when in Tehran, he found "that there were two completely separate cities, one poor and devout, the other bourgeois and disenchanted. North Tehranis were frozen in time, like White Russians or French monarchists, left on the sidelines by the revolution."

Baghdad Without a Map is just about the perfect book, but one thing would have made it even better--and that is the inclusion of photographs. In fact, this is a criticism I have of almost all of Horwitz's books. But other than that, Baghdad Without a Map is an excellent book and will give the reader a better understanding of the many issues still plaguing the Middle East. The edition I purchased even had a new epilogue written after the Persian Gulf War. And after reading this work, I can understand why Horwitz's wife told him "Once the Middle East's in your blood, you've got it for life. Like Malaria."