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eBook The Last Dive: A Father and Son's Fatal Descent into the Ocean's Depths ePub

eBook The Last Dive: A Father and Son's Fatal Descent into the Ocean's Depths ePub

by Bernie Chowdhury

  • ISBN: 0060194626
  • Category: Specialty Travel
  • Subcategory: Travels
  • Author: Bernie Chowdhury
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper; First Edition edition (October 3, 2000)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1853 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1606 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 723

Description

Chris and Chrissy Rouse, an experienced father-and-son scuba diving team, hoped to achieve widespread recognition for their . Bernie Chowdhury is the founder and co-publisher of The Inteinational Technical Diving Magazine.

Chris and Chrissy Rouse, an experienced father-and-son scuba diving team, hoped to achieve widespread recognition for their outstanding but controversial diving skills. Obsessed and ambitious. A world-class diver, Explorers Club Fellow, and a recognized expert on extreme sport diving, he also makes documentary films and is a frequent lecturer.

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Chris and Chrissy Rouse, an experienced father-and-son scuba diving. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Last Dive: A Father and Son's Fatal Descent into the Ocean's Depths as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Last Dive: A Father and Son's Fatal Descent into the Ocean's Depths (2000) is a non-fiction book written by diver Bernie Chowdhury and published by HarperCollins. It documents the fatal dive of Chris Rouse, Sr. and Chris "Chrissy" Rouse, J. a father-son team who perished off the New Jersey coast in 1992. The author is a dive expert and was a friend of the Rouses.

Bernie Chowdhury, himself an expert diver and a close friend of the Rouses', explores the thrill-seeking world of. .

Bernie Chowdhury, himself an expert diver and a close friend of the Rouses', explores the thrill-seeking world of deep-sea diving, including its legendary figures, most celebrated triumphs, and gruesome tragedies. By examining the diver's psychology through the complex father-and-son dynamic, Chowdhury illuminates the extreme sport diver's push toward-and sometimes beyond-the limits of human endurance.

Have you ever wondered what it's REALLY like to go into a recompression chamber?

book by Bernie Chowdhury . If you're a diver- YOU'VE GOT TO LISTEN TO/READ THIS BOOK! Take it on your next dive trip. Extremely well-written story, but the 'tragedy' doesn't play.

Аудиокнига "The Last Dive: A Father and Son's Fatal Descent into the Ocean's Depths", Bernie Chowdhury. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Chris and Chrissy Rouse, an experienced father-and-son scuba diving team, hoped to achieve widespread recognition for their outstanding but controversial diving skills.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Chris and Chrissy Rouse, an experienced father-and-son scuba diving team, hoped to achieve widespread recognition for their outstanding but controversial diving skills. Obsessed and ambitious, they sought to solve the secrets of a mysterious, undocumented World War II German U-boat that lay under 230 feet of water, only a half-day's mission from New York Harbor. In doing so, they paid the ultimate price in their quest for fame.

Автор: Chowdhury Bernie Название: The Last Dive: A Father and Son& Fatal . In his compelling new book, bestselling author and globally recognized management consultant Subir Chowdhury tackles an issue that has haunted him in his work with many of the world's largest organizations.

In his compelling new book, bestselling author and globally recognized management consultant Subir Chowdhury tackles an issue that has haunted him in his work with many of the world's largest organizations. Why is it that some improve only incrementally, while others improve 50 times that? The ideas and training are exactly the same.

In this gripping recounting of their diving tragedy, author Bernie Chowdhury, himself an expert diver, explores the thrill-seeking, high-risk world of deep sea diving, its legendary figures, most celebrated triumphs, and notorious tragedies. 50 people like this topic

In this gripping recounting of their diving tragedy, author Bernie Chowdhury, himself an expert diver, explores the thrill-seeking, high-risk world of deep sea diving, its legendary figures, most celebrated triumphs, and notorious tragedies. 50 people like this topic.

Bernie Chowdhury is the founder and publisher of Immersed, the international technical diving magazine, and a recognised authority on extreme sport diving

The author recreates this terrible event in an effort to understand it and shed light on man's obsession with the unknown and the extreme. Bernie Chowdhury is the founder and publisher of Immersed, the international technical diving magazine, and a recognised authority on extreme sport diving. Bernie was made a Fellow of the Explorers Club in 1995. Country of Publication.

What price would you pay for adventure and knowledge?

Chris and Chrissy Rouse, an experienced father-and-son scuba diving team, hoped to achieve widespread recognition for their outstanding but controversial diving skills. Obsessed and ambitious, they sought to solve the secrets of a mysterious, undocumented World War II German U-boat that lay under 230 feet of water, only a half-day's mission from New York Harbor. They paid the ultimate price in their quest for fame.

This gripping narrative recounts the Rouses' growing lust for what many consider the world's most dangerous sport -- as well as for the cowboy culture of the deepdiving community. Father and son were only eighteen years apart in age, and their constant battles of will earned them the nickname "the Bicker Brothers." Many friends wondered which would win out if it came down to a life-or-death diving situation: Chris's protective instincts or Chrissy's desire to surpass his father's successes.

In the surreal topographies of underwater caves and shipwrecks, divers can encounter the unfathomable. Some get lost until their air expires, some get hopelessly tangled in cables, some are drawn to deep chambers from which they never emerge, and some make simple human errors. The sport's best may eventually find themselves in silt-filled water, dark as night, and pinned by dislodged wreckage. If they panic and use up their air, they put themselves at risk of drowning or of what divers fear the most-decompression sickness, or "the bends."

Author Bernie Chowdhury, himself an expert diver and a dose friend of the Rouses', explores the thrill-seeking world of deep-sea diving, including its legendary figures, most celebrated triumphs, and gruesome tragedies. By examining the diver's psychology through the complex father-and-son dynamic, Chowdhury illuminates the extreme sport diver's push toward -- and sometimes beyond -- the limits of human endurance.

Comments

Samugul Samugul
Overall, this was a good book but I had to periodically stop. It was mostly well-written but with a few concerns. When Chris and Chrissy surfaced, heart wrenching to imagine what was going on, there was dialogue about Chatterton intubating (high level of respiratory support) one of the victims. Not to take anything away from the seriousness of the situation, there is verbiage that Chatterton was an anesthesiologist. He was not. He was a combat medic in Vietnam. Legally, he did not have the licensure to intubate. There was a Registered Nurse on the ship during this fateful episode and with specific training, she may have been certified to intubate, but not Chatterton. It doesn't change the end result but it's not accurate.
Another interesting point was it appeared that the Rouse's prided themselves on preparing for a dive. Page after page, the reader knows how well they prepare for a dive - redundancy of gear, diving plan, etc. - they went into a dive prepared for problems. However, I don't understand why the boat wasn't prepared to handle someone who gets severely bent. To call for an emergency evacuation and wait? I've done sport diving and have no desire to place myself in a situation where there are no contingency plans. There are portable decompression chambers that can be placed on boats - should have been one in this situation. All boats who serve as a dive platform for deep dives should have one. I could not operate a boat who served as a dive platform for deep dives, in good conscious, without one.
My heart breaks to think what these guys were thinking when they surfaced. They knew.
Dorizius Dorizius
This was a good and interesting read, but read Shadow Divers first. If the story of the U-Boat and the whole field of wreck diving interests you, this book is a good follow-up. It kind of jumps around a bit from the father and son to the author and spends a lot of time on the history and technical aspects of diving, but, as said, if that interests you then it is a good read. It will also save you a lot of money in that if you are normal, you will have no interest in ever diving deep - very much like 'Into thin Air' dissuades you from every wanting to climb Everest ;-).
Road.to sliver Road.to sliver
The Last Dive: A Father and Son's Fatal Descent into the Ocean's Depths
Although the outcome of the story is a very sad one, Bernie Chowdhury does an excellent job at bringing you into the lives of his friends and making you feel like you knew them. he explains things pretty clearly and even helps non-divers understand more technical aspects. his descriptiveness makes you feel like you're right there with them. this is an excellent book and it was hard to put it down. Chris and Chrissy are two of my newest heroes and this story helped spur me back into Diving action. i highly recommend this book for anyone, diver or not.
Swift Summer Swift Summer
A gripping and engaging story. The writing is so detailed that you are transported to the scene of the events. Towards the beginning of the book, I wasn't really digging Chris and Chrissy and their competitiveness. But as I got further and further into the book, I found that I really liked this family, I wished that I could get the chance to meet these colorful individuals, and I really did want them to survive their last dive, although I already knew the outcome. I learned a lot from their mistakes, but even more from their experiences. Bernie Chowdhury did an excellent job telling the tale of these two larger than life individuals.
Anyshoun Anyshoun
This is a thrilling and readable book. It is a good adventure story with a human touch, and an interesting description of the earlier days of technical diving in the US. Technical diving is the type of diving where divers venture deeper than is typically done in recreational dives, and where they explore caves and wrecks. Such dives involve far more advanced training, planning and gear and much more risk than the usual dive on a sunny coral reef in the Caribbean would. The main protagonists of this book, the Rouses, father and son, engage in both cave and wreck diving, while living out their extroverted, prank-loving, bickering characters at the same time. The book's author, Bernie Chowdhury, was a personal friend of theirs and gives a colorful description of their adventures under water and social encounters in the world of diving.

The books ends with the Rouses' death on a wreck laying in deep water off the US East coast. At this point, it turns from a description of exciting adventurous dives and the often hilarious attics of this father-son team into a stomach-clenching description of a fatal accident. It is essentially a study on how NOT to conduct any type of advanced diving: the Rouses' big egos made them take undue risks in poor conditions and they saved money on improved breathing gases, the Helium - air mixes reducing the narcotic effects of nitrogen that can cast a thick fog over a diver's mind. Rather they decided to dive using regular - at this depth highly narcotic - air. The younger Rouse then got stuck in the tight interior of the wreck (due to the strong nitrogen narcosis at that depth hallucinating that he was being swallowed by a monster) and after a rescue effort by his father, they failed to locate the tanks necessary for a slow ascent. The sprint to the surface did not allow their bodies to get rid of the dissolved gasses absorbed in the high-pressure conditions at depth, and both of them perished. Naturally, hindsight is 20/20, and I certainly feel empathy for them and how they died a horrible panicked painful death. Nevertheless, I believe that this story was clearly not an unforeseeable tragedy, but serves as a prime example of how a series of poor judgments and decisions will amplify the already large risks inherent in deep and wreck diving. May others learn from them!