cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Hack: How I Stopped Worrying About What to Do with My Life and Started Driving a Yellow Cab
eBook Hack: How I Stopped Worrying About What to Do with My Life and Started Driving a Yellow Cab ePub

eBook Hack: How I Stopped Worrying About What to Do with My Life and Started Driving a Yellow Cab ePub

by Melissa Plaut

  • ISBN: 1400066042
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Travels
  • Author: Melissa Plaut
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Villard; First Edition edition (August 28, 2007)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1588 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1805 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 245

Description

In her late twenties and after a series of unsatisfying office jobs, Melissa Plaut decided she was going to stop worrying about what to do with the rest of her life I had always thought about driving a cab, just thought it’d be interesting and different, a good way to make money. But it always seemed like a fleeting whim, a funny idea, something I would never actually do.

Having driven a cab myself back in the seventies in Boston, I know what she went through and just how tough the job . I would recommend this book to everyone, but in particular to those who use cabs often. Read what a driver feels and then examine your behavior while you are in the back seat.

Having driven a cab myself back in the seventies in Boston, I know what she went through and just how tough the job really is. The author well describes the terrible drivers, the constant hustle, the tense interactions with the police and the lunatic customers that seem to be everywhere. The author describes the day to day tidbits of driving, interspersed with her own personal demons about the job. It is really one of those jobs you can love and hate at the same time. It may open your eyes a little.

Автор: Plaut Melissa Название: Hack: How I Stopped Worrying about . Martin Plaut& book offers a glimpse into a relatively young nation marred by a stifling dictatorship.

Hack traces Plauts first two years behind the wheel of a yellow cab traveling the 6,400 miles of New York City streets.

Hack was merged with this page. In her late 20s, Plaut decided to honor a long-held secret ambition by becoming a New York City taxi driver. With wit and insight, she recreates the crazy parade of humanity that passes through her cab and shows how this grueling work provides her with a greater sense of self. 31 people like this topic.

Hack traces Plaut’s first two years behind the wheel of a yellow cab traveling the 6,400 miles of New York City . Melissa Plaut was born in 1975 and grew up in the suburbs of New York City

Hack traces Plaut’s first two years behind the wheel of a yellow cab traveling the 6,400 miles of New York City streets. Melissa Plaut was born in 1975 and grew up in the suburbs of New York City. After college, she held a series of office jobs until, at the age of twenty-nine, she began driving a yellow cab. A year later she started writing New York Hack (newyorkhack. com), a blog about her experiences behind the wheel. Within a few months, the blog was receiving several thousand hits a day. Melissa Plaut lives in Brooklyn.

Her subsequent book Hack: How I Stopped Worrying About What to Do with My Life and Started Driving a Yellow Cab was published by Villard (a division of Random House) in 2007

Her subsequent book Hack: How I Stopped Worrying About What to Do with My Life and Started Driving a Yellow Cab was published by Villard (a division of Random House) in 2007. At the time of publication, women made up only about 200 of the 40,000 cab drivers in NYC. She has written for The New York Times, The Huffington. Post, and has had essays air on NPR's "All Things Considered" and "Weekend America

Hack : How I Stopped Worrying about What to Do with My Life and Started Driving a Yellow Cab. by Melissa Plaut. I had always thought about driving a cab, just thought it'd be interesting and different, a good way to make money. But it always seemed like a fleeting whim, a funny idea, something I would never actually d. In her late twenties and after a series of unsatisfying office jobs, Melissa Plaut decided she was going to stop worrying about what to do with the rest of her life and focus on what she was going to do next.

Melissa Plaut's Hack is an interesting and entertaining read. Plaut also examines the ideas of how to figure out what to do with one's life, but that stream of thought is never resolved, somewhat appropriately. There's not a big conflict and resolution in the book, but rather a general overview of what it's like driving a taxi in New York City for a couple years. Plaut also examines the ideas of how to figure out what to do with one's life, but that stream of thought is never resolved, somewhat appropriately

“I had always thought about driving a cab, just thought it’d be interesting and different, a good way to make money. But it always seemed like a fleeting whim, a funny idea, something I would never actually do.”In her late twenties and after a series of unsatisfying office jobs, Melissa Plaut decided she was going to stop worrying about what to do with the rest of her life and focus on what she was going to do next. Her first adventure: becoming a taxi driver. Undeterred by the fact that 99 percent of cabbies in the city were men, she went to taxi school, got her hack license, and hit the streets of Manhattan and the outlying boroughs.Hack traces Plaut’s first two years behind the wheel of a yellow cab traveling the 6,400 miles of New York City streets. She shares the highs, the lows, the shortcuts, and professional trade secrets. Between figuring out where and when to take a bathroom break and trying to avoid run-ins with the NYPD, Plaut became an honorary member of a diverse brotherhood that included Harvey, the cross-dressing cabbie; the dispatcher affectionately called “Paul the crazy Romanian”; and Lenny, the garage owner rumored to be the real-life prototype for TV’s Louie De Palma of Taxi.With wicked wit and arresting insight, Melissa Plaut reveals the crazy parade of humanity that passed through her cab–including struggling actors, federal judges, bartenders, strippers, and drug dealers–while showing how this grueling work provided her with empowerment and a greater sense of self. Hack introduces an irresistible new voice that is much like New York itself–vivid, profane, lyrical, and ineffably hip

Comments

The Sinners from Mitar The Sinners from Mitar
Plaut is a few years older than I am, and this book is older than that still with Hurricane Katrina and the MTA strike prominent newsworthy moments in her ~ two year career as a nearly full time NYC cabbie. Unlike many books which grow out of blogs, this book was edited together really well into a cohesive story that covered the two years from when she got her hack license to when her accident settlement check came through and she could afford to work less-for her physical and mental wellbeing. I was sad to find that her blog hasn't been updated in nearly ten years despite her keeping her license active and I found myself wondering where she is today.

While I liked her crazy stories of passengers, from cheapskates to strippers who tip well, what I really liked were the people she worked with, from Paul to Rodrigo from Daniel to Helen. I found the story of Helen particularly compelling and I hope they got their final get together as was alluded to as she wrapped the book.

NYC taxi life has changed with the advent of Uber/Lyft/etc. but this was a great read of the other sides to it you don't typically see, and a NYC that isn't fully still here.
Olma Olma
In this book, the author takes the reader on an interesting look at the world of driving a taxi cab in New York City. Having driven a cab myself back in the seventies in Boston, I know what she went through and just how tough the job really is. The author well describes the terrible drivers, the constant hustle, the tense interactions with the police and the lunatic customers that seem to be everywhere.

The author describes the day to day tidbits of driving, interspersed with her own personal demons about the job. It is really one of those jobs you can love and hate at the same time. The only reason many drivers stay is because you can make good money doing it if you don't burn out first. I know it helped pay my way through college, which no minimum wage job could do.

I would recommend this book to everyone, but in particular to those who use cabs often. Read what a driver feels and then examine your behavior while you are in the back seat. It may open your eyes a little.
Matty Matty
Good book full of fun situation
Altad Altad
This is a pretty interesting look at the often mundane world of driving a New York cab. At times the language is pretty rudimentary, but that's fair considering I believe it's a first time author. A must read if you live in NYC, and a much better prep book for visitors excited to go there than any Frommers guide.
Damand Damand
Good book. This chic has had an interesting life as a cab driver (hack)and her experiences make for some good stories. I used to read her blog, "New York Hack" way back when; before she wrote the book.
Xaluenk Xaluenk
this is a great read for anyone who loves the real NYC, its people and its unique way of life
Porgisk Porgisk
Never read Melissa's blog, but the book reads very journal like. I was flirting with the idea of being a cab driver for a spell during the recession and this book gave me some insight into that world.
LOVE this book - could not put it down. Melissa Plaut is one of my all time heroes! Just hope she knows how she has elevated the respect I have for cab drivers and humannity in general. Breath of fresh air.